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University of Colorado Denver

Center for Global Health | Colorado School of Public Health
 

Future Leaders in Global Health

See How Scholarships Can Make a Difference to Our Students and to Underserved Countries Around the Globe


 

Two students at the School of Medicine at the University of Colorado Denver were recipients of scholarships managed by the Center for Global Health.  These scholarships help fund their global health projects so they could make an impact in two underserved countries.  Read their story to see how you can make a difference and become a part of our global mission.

They are Casey Weimer, a third-year student focusing on community health and education in Latin America; and Kalen Abbott, a third-year student and avid traveler, who has returned from a TB/HIV study in South Africa.

As a track and field athlete in college, Abbott traveled all over the United States for competitions. In addition to seeing the country, he was also exposed to the diversity of his international and domestic teammates. 

“My entire team was international. As a close-knit team, they would share stories of their homes and customs,” says Abbott.

This exposure to other cultures was just the beginning for Abbott, as he caught the ‘travel-bug’ and decided that his future career path would undoubtedly lead him across borders.

“My love for travel, appreciation for other cultures and desire for medicine led me to apply to University of Colorado Denver. I got into medical school and I immediately applied for the Global Health Track.  The rest is history.”

Weimer decided global health was her career path after seeing evidence of poor health care during a Semester at Sea program.

“Witnessing the health disparities in countries like Burma, South Africa and India were motivation alone to start exploring the possibilities for what my role could be,” she says.

Currently, Weimer is working on an education project within rural Guatemala, targeting adolescent girls at risk for pregnancy. In a region where the average age of a girl’s first pregnancy is 14 to 15, Weimer is focusing on capacity building and educational projects, including discussion of topics that range from self-esteem to hygiene and reproductive health.

Without scholarship opportunities to assist in the education and training of our future leaders, not all students would have the privilege to experience these global projects.  These global opportunities make it possible to have well educated and trained future leaders in global health. 

All students at the University of Colorado who are training in health science programs are eligible for the scholarships offered through the Center for Global Health. 

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