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Collaborative Resources on the AMC


One of the goals of the Human Immune Monitoring Shared Resource is to foster collaborative research. Listed below are additional resources on the Anschutz medical campus that may be utilized to extend the scope of your immune monitoring studies.​

Genomics and Microarray Core
The Genomics and Microarray Core at the University of Colorado Denver is a genomic and proteomic facility providing access to Next Generation Sequencing, DNA microarray, single-cell genomics, and Somalogic proteomic technology for the University and surrounding research institutions.

Skaggs School of Pharmacy Mass Spectrometry Facility
The School of Pharmacy Mass Spectrometry Facility was established in 2007 to centralize and organize the mass spectrometry instrumentation and proteomics capabilities.  Since then, the facility has expanded again, with the arrival of the Reisdorph Lab in 2015.  The facility now boasts over 13 mass spectrometers with capabilities spanning proteomics, metabolomics, small molecule analysis, and beyond.

Structural Biology and Biochemistry Program Proteomics Core Facility Services
The Proteomics Core Facility offers a range of services, including protein identification, sample cleanup, protein quantitation, post-translational modification analysis, phosphopeptide affinity purification, multidimensional fractionation of proteins and peptides, depletion of IgG/albumin and high abundance proteins, and intact molecular weight measurement.

CU Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Shared Resource
Using flow cytometric analysis, high-speed cell sorting, and multiplexed fluorescent microsphere assays, the CU Cancer Center Flow Cytometry Shared Resource (FCSR) can perform a wide range of assays supporting cancer research, including cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell viability, cell signaling, stem cell detection, fluorescent protein analysis and cell phenotyping. These assays are crucial to understand how cancer derails normal cellular processes to cause disease.