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FDC Phase I & II Goals


The Foundations of Doctoring Curriculum (FDC) is a three-year curriculum required of all students admitted to the University of Colorado School of Medicine (SOM).  Our vision is to prepare you to be an outstanding physician who will care for our diverse society.  Our mission is to provide a dynamic, integrated curriculum of foundational clinical and professional skills and experiences.​
      

The FDC in Phase I is composed of the following: 

  • Physical examination sessions
  • Communication coaching sessions
  • Continuity clinic with a physician preceptor (preceptorship)
  • Professional development sessions and activities
  • Assessment of your clinical skills  
FDC Phase I Goals (PDF with objectives)

  •  Know and use the language of physical examination structures, techniques and findings.
  • Relate the physical examination to normal anatomy and physiology.
  • Relate the physical examination to abnormal anatomy and pathophysiology.
  • "Perform basic physical examination techniques on adults and children in the following areas:
    - General Assessment (Vital Signs)
    - Extremities and Back
    - Cardiovascular
    - Chest and Lungs
    - Abdomen
    - Head and Neck
    - Skin, Hair and Nails"
  • Know and use the language of relationship centered clinical encounters and communication techniques specific to introductions and agenda settings, information gathering, sustaining structure and relationships and closing and forward planning.
  • Identify the key subjective and objective components of the patient data base gathered in the encounter: patient identification, chief complaint, history of present illness, active medical problems, past medical history, medications, allergies, social history, family history, and physical exam findings.
  • Identify the key components of the SOAP note.
  • Practice writing SOAP notes and avoiding common pitfalls in SOAP note writing.
  • Know and use the language of fundamental clinical reasoning concepts, including problem representations, semantic transformation, and key features.
  • Practice clinical reasoning skill through creation of accurate problem representations, identification of key features of the patient's subjective and objective presentation, and creation of a summary statement using semantic qualifiers.
  • Practice a hypothesis-driven approach to history taking and physical examination based on the patients presenting complaints.
  • Practice compassionate treatment of patients, and respect for their privacy and dignity.
  • Uphold and promote the ideals of medical professionalism in all interactions with patients, colleagues, staff and faculty.
  • Recognize and accept limitations in one’s knowledge and clinical skills, and a commitment to continuously improve one’s knowledge and ability.
  • Recognize the importance of cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity and its impact on society, health care delivery, and the workplace.
  • Recognize the impact of economics on healthcare delivery
  • Identify the basic legal obligations of clinical practice.
  • Understand and respect the roles of other health care professionals and the need to collaborate with others in caring for individual patients.
  • Identify characteristics of effective teamwork.
  • Begin career exploration. ​​​
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The FDC in Phase II is composed of the following: 
As you enter the second phase of the Foundations of Doctoring Curriculum (FDC), you will be building on many of the skills you learned in Phase I.

  • Continuity clinic with a physician preceptor (preceptorship)
  • Advanced physical examination sessions
  • Advanced communication sessions
  • Complete History and Physical (H&P) write-up
  • Oral presentation skill session
  • Professional development sessions and activities
  • Assessment of your clinical skills
FDC Phase II Goals (PDF with objectives)

  • Relate the physical examination to normal anatomy and physiology.
  • Relate the physical examination to abnormal anatomy and pathophysiology.
  • Know variations in physical exam techniques for use with children and the elderly.
  • Perform basic physical examination techniques on adults and children in the following areas: General Assessment (vital signs); extremities and back; cardiovascular; chest and lungs; abdomen; head and neck; hair and nails, neurologic, eyes, and uro/gyn.
  • Perform a head-to-toe core physical exam based on a provided checklist of items that would be appropriate for the performance of a complete history and physical.
  • Know and use the language of relationship centered clinical encounters and communication techniques specific to introductions and agenda settings, information gathering, sustaining structure and relationships, closing and forward planning, sharing information, and negotiating a treatment plan.
  • Begin to use appropriate relationship centered communication techniques in difficult clinical encounters.
  • Know the content of and practice taking a sexual history.
  • Identify the key subjective and objective components of the patient data base gathered in the encounter to perform a complete history and physical: patient identification, chief complaint, history of present illness, active medical problems, past medical history, medications, allergies, social history, family history, review of systems, and physical exam findings.
  • Identify the key components of the history and physical write-up, SOAP note and oral presentation
  • Understand the fundamental clinical reasoning concepts, including problem representation, semantic transformation, key features, illness scripts, and differential diagnosis.
  • Obtain an accurate medical history that covers all essential aspects of the patient data base, including issues related to age, gender, and socioeconomic status.
  • Practice writing a full history and physical, SOAP notes and performing oral presentations.
  • Know clinical reasoning concepts including analytical and intuitive reasoning techniques to solve clinical problems and develop assessment and plans for patients.
  • Use comparison and contrast routinely in analyzing differential diagnoses.
  • Demonstrate the use of a hypothesis-driven approach to history taking, physical examination, and data collection.
  • Understand analytical methods for patient differential diagnosis such as prioritized, system based, and pathophysiologic techniques.
  • Practice compassionate treatment of patients, and respect for their privacy and dignity.
  • Uphold and promote the ideals of medical professionalism in all interactions with patients, colleagues, staff and faculty.
  • Recognize and accept limitations in one’s knowledge and clinical skills, and a commitment to continuously improve one’s knowledge and ability.
  • Recognize the importance of cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity and its impact on society, health care delivery, and the workplace.
  • Know basic concepts of quality improvement, patient safety, and leadership through completion of the IHI Open School Basic Certification.​
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