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More Doctors Are Warning Patients to Eat Less Meat


​It’s not exactly news that fruits and veggies are good for you. But historically, physicians have been reluctant to make any diet recommendations at all to their patients. Medical schools don’t teach much about nutrition.
 
Andrew Freeman, a cardiologist with National Jewish Health hospital in Denver, Colorado, says that doctors often worry that patients will balk at the idea of radically altering what they eat. But that’s slowly changing: Freeman, who follows a vegan diet himself, now recommends a “plant-based diet” to his patients. He talks more about this decision on this week’s episode of Mother Jones‘ food politics podcast Bite:
 
A number of mainstream medical groups now endorse vegetarian (or vegetarian-ish) diets, including the American Cancer Society, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and, over protests from the meat industry, the USDA group that issues dietary guidelines. In 2014, the American College of Cardiology elected its first ever vegan president, Dr. Kim A. Williams. In 2013, Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest healthcare network, asked its physicians to suggest a plant-based diet to their patients. Just this week, the American Medical Association passed a resolution recommending that hospitals offer patients non-meat meals.