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Peter M. Henson, Ph.D.

Professor of Pathology and Medicine


 



 

  Peter M. Henson, Ph.D.
  Professor of Pathology and Medicine

 

  University of Colorado Denver

  Pulmonary Sciences & Critical Care Medicine

  hensonp@njc.org 

 

Education & Training
Edinburgh University, Scotland

1963 BVM&S Veterinary Medicine
1964 B.Sc. Hon Bacteriology

University of Cambridge, England
1967 Ph.D. Immunopathology
  
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

1967 - 1969
Research Fellow, Department of Experimental Pathology, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, California

1969 - 1972
Associate, Department of Experimental Pathology, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, California

1972 - 1977
Associate Member, Department of Immunopathology, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, California

1977 - 1980
Director of Research, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Hospital and Research Center, National Asthma Center

1977 - present
Professor of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine

1980 - present
Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine

1980 - 1982
Vice-Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Center

1981 - 1982
Associate Vice President for Professional Services, National Jewish Center

1986 - 1987
Co-Head, Pulmonary Division, Department of Medicine University of Colorado Denver

1982 - 1996
Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, Colorado

1996 - present
Professor of Pathology and Medicine, National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, Colorado

PUBLICATIONS (Selected from 358 publications)

1.Bratton DL, Fadok VA, Richter D, Kailey JM, Guthrie LA, Henson PM. Appearance of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells requires calcium-mediated nonspecific flip-flop and is enhanced by loss of the aminophospholipid translocase. J. Biol. Chem. 272:26159-26165, 1997.


2.Fadok VA, Bratton DL, Konowal A, Freed PW, Westcott JY, Henson PM. Macrophages that have ingested apoptotic cells in vitro inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms involving TGFb, PGE2, and PAF. J. Clin. Invest. 101:890-898, 1998.


3.Frasch SC, Nick JA, Fadok V, Bratton DL, Worthen GS, Henson PM. p38-dependent and -independent intracellular signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis in human neutrophils. J. Biol. Chem. 273:8389-8397, 1998.


4.Fadok VA, Bratton DL, Frasch SC, Warner ML, Henson PM. The role of phosphatidylserine in recognition of apoptotic cells by phagocytes. Cell Death Differentiation. 5:551-561, 1998.


5.Fadok VA, Henson PM. Apoptosis: getting rid of the bodies. Current Biol. 8:R693-R695, 1998.


6.Fadok VA, Warner ML, Bratton DL, Henson PM. CD36 is required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by human macrophages that use either a phosphatidylserine receptor or the vitronectin receptor (avb3). J. Immunol. 161:6250-6257, 1998.


7.Fadok VA, McDonald PP, Bratton DL, Henson PM. Regulation of macrophage cytokine production by phagocytosis of apoptotic and post-apoptotic cells. Biochem. Soc. Trans. 26:653-656, 1998.


8.Hildeman DA, Mitchell T, Teague TK, Henson P, Day BJ, Kappler J, Marrack PC. Reactive oxygen species regulate activation induced T cell apoptosis. Immunity. 10:735-744, 1999.


9.Nick JA, Avdi NJ, Young SK, Lehman LA, McDonald PP, Frasch SC, Billstrom MA, Henson PM, Johnson GL, Worthen GS. An intracellular signaling pathway in the neutrophil linking LPS stimulation to cellular responses of the human neutrophil: the p38 MAP kinase cascade and its functional significance. Chest. 116:54S-55S, 1999.


10.Bratton DB, Fadok VA, Richter DA, Kailey JM, Frasch S C, Nakamura T, Henson PM. Polyamine regulation of plasma membrane phospholipid flip-flop during apoptosis. J. Biol. Chem. 274:28113-28120, 1999.


11.Sala A, Zarini S, Folco G, Murphy RC, Henson PM. Differential metabolism of exogenous and endogenous arachidonic acid in human neutrophils. J. Biol. Chem. 274:28264-28269, 1999.


12.McDonald P, Fadok VA, Bratton DL, Henson PM. Transcriptional and translational regulation of inflammatory mediator production by endogenous TGF-b in macrophages that have ingested apoptotic cells. J. Immunol. 163:6164-6172, 1999.


13.Nick JA, Young SK, Brown K, Avdi NJ, Arndt PG, Suratt BT, Janes MS, Henson PM, Worthen GS. Role of p38 MAP kinase in a murine model of pulmonary inflammation. J Immunol. 164:2151-2159, 2000.

 
14.Keane MP, Henson PM, Strieter RM. Inflammation, injury, and repair. In: Textbook of Respiratory Medicine, 3rd Edition, Volume 1, Eds: Murray JF, Nadel JA, Mason RJ, Boushey Jr H. W.B. SaundersCo., Philadelphia, PA, pp 495-538, 2000.


15.Yujuri T, Ware M, Widmann C, Oyer R, Russell D, Chan E, Zaitsu Y, Clarke P, Tyler K, Oka Y, Fanger GR, Henson P, Johnson GL. MEK kinase 1 gene disruption alters cell migration and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase regulation but does not cause a measurable defect in NFkB activation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97(13):7272-7277, 2000.


16.Fadok VA, Bratton DL, Rose D, Pearson A, Ezekowitz A, Henson PM. A receptor for phosphatidylserine-specific clearance of apoptotic cells. Nature 405:85-90, 2000.


17.Henson P. and Wenzel SE. Neutrophils and their Mediators in Asthma. In: Asthma and Rhinitis. William Busse, M.D. Editor. Blackwell Science, Inc., Oxford. Vol 1. Part 8:Neutrophils and Platelets, Chapter 32, pages 503-517, 2000.


18.Whitlock BB, Gardai S, Fadok V, Bratton D, Henson PM. Differential roles for ƒÑmƒÒ2 integrin clustering or activation in the control of apoptosis via regulation of Akt and ERK survival mechanisms. J Cell Biol. 151:1305-1320, 2000.


19.Taylor PR, Carugati A, Fadok VA, Cook HT, Andrews M, Carroll MC, Savill JS, Henson PM, Botto M, Walport MJ. A heirarchical role for classical pathway complement proteins in the clearance of apoptotic cells in vivo: a mechanism for protection from autoimmunity. J Exp Med. 192:359-366, 2000.


20.Henson, P. Complementing asthma. Nature Immunology. 1(3):190-192, 2000.


21.Bowers RC, Hevko J, Henson PM, Murphy RC. A novel glutathione containing eicosanoid (FOG7) chemotactic for human granulocytes. J Biol Chem 275(39):29931-29934, 2000.


22.Keane MP, Henson PM, Strieter RM. Inflammation, injury, and repair. In: Textbook of Respiratory Medicine, 3rd Edition, Volume 1, Eds: Murray JF, Nadel JA, Mason RJ, Boushey Jr H. W.B. SaundersCo., Philadelphia, PA, pp 495-538, 2000.


23.Avdi NJ, Nick JA, Whitlock, BB Billstrom MA, Henson PM, Johnson GL, Worthen GS. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Ą activation of the c-Jun N

-terminal kinase pathway in human neutrophils. J Biol Chem, 276:2189-2199, 2001.
24.Ogden CA, deCathelineau A, Hoffmann PR, Fadok VA, Bratton D, Henson PM. C1q and collectin engagement of cell surface calreticulin initiates macropinocytosis and uptake of apoptotic cells. J. Exp. Med. 194(6):781-796, 2001.


25.Henson PM, Bratton DL, Fadok VA. The phosphatidylserine receptor: a crucial molecular switch? Nature Reviews/Molecular Cell Biology 2:627-633, 2001.


26.Fadok VA, de Cathelineau A, Henson PM, Bratton DL. Loss of phospholipid asymmetry and surface exposure of phosphatidylserine is required for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages and fibroblasts. J. Biol. Chem. 276(2):1071-1077, 2001.