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University of Colorado Denver Business School, offering Bachelor, MBA, MS, and PhD degrees

Business School, University of Colorado Denver
 


Jeffrey R. Nystrom, Instructor of Management

Education

  • MS Management, University of Colorado at Denver
  • BS Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver

Courses Taught

  • Strategic Management, BUSN6710
  • Organization Design, MGMT4370
  • Business Policy and Strategic Management, MGMT4500
  • Designing Effective Organizations, MGMT6360

Teaching Philosophy

Teaching is definitely the part of my job that gives me the most satisfaction. I am passionate about teaching and I am dedicated to using my passion for teaching to help individuals realize their dreams.

Fundamental Operating Philosophies

  • Optimism: I bring to the classroom an optimistic view of human nature. Unless students demonstrate otherwise, I assume that they are intelligent, trustworthy, and have a genuine desire to learn.
  • Professionalism: Inherent in my position as a teacher is the power to influence others. I am cognizant of this fact and I am committed to using the power inherent in my position responsibly.
  • Rigor: I presume students are highly motivated and, hence, they demand and will enthusiastically accept nothing less than a challenging course. Moreover, I am convinced students perform best when they are asked to achieve difficult goals and are expected to perform at very high levels. Therefore, my courses are designed to be academically challenging and to promote intellectual growth.
  • Relevancy and Utility: I am dedicated to regularly updating my courses so that their content reflects germane changes in industry practices and critical advancements in knowledge and to ensure that they facilitate the development and acquisition of the knowledge, skills, and abilities students need to succeed in tomorrow’s business environment. While my courses introduce students to the latest theoretical and empirical research in the field of management, I use pedagogical techniques that give each student the opportunity to practice applying the knowledge acquired in my courses – as well as knowledge acquired from prior coursework – to real-world business issues and situations. Wherever possible, I use up-to-date, real-world examples and cases as well as in-class exercises and practical course assignments to facilitate learning. In general, my courses strike a healthy balance between theory and practice. Nonetheless, I tend to place much greater emphasis on practical application.
  • Participation and Involvement: In general, I conduct my classes using a lecture/discussion format, with greater emphasis on and more time dedicated to discussion. I place greater emphasis on discussion because I am firmly convinced that the effortless act of passively listening to my lectures and advice about management will do very little to enhance a student’s management skills. The discussion method, in conjunction with the use of many in-class exercises, enables me to create a learning environment in which I can effectively disseminate important theoretical and conceptual material and at the same time give students the opportunity to fully participate in the learning process.
  • Enthusiasm: I believe effective teachers bring a high-level of energy and enthusiasm to the classroom.
  • Integrity: I operate with high standards of honesty and integrity. I grade with integrity and I assign grades that accurately index each student’s academic performance. Similarly, I have absolutely no tolerance for students that violate the academic honor code. Bottom line: scholastic integrity is an implicit prerequisite for all of my courses.

The following statement by William Lyon Phelps captures the essence of what teaching means to me.

I do not know that I could make entirely clear to an outsider the pleasure I have in teaching. I had rather earn my living by teaching than in any other way. In my mind, teaching is not merely a life work, a profession, an occupation, a struggle: it is a passion. I love to teach as a painter loves to paint, as a musician loves to play, as a singer loves to sing, as a strong man rejoices to run a race. Teaching is an art—an art so great and so difficult to master that a man or woman can spend a long life at it, without realizing much more than his limitations and mistakes, and his distance from the ideal. But the main aim of my happy days has been to become a good teacher, just as every architect wishes to be a good architect, and every professional poet strives towards perfection.

William Lyon Phelps

Professional History

I am an instructor of management teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in strategic management and organization theory. I began my career as an educator in 1995 and spent five years on the faculty at College America – Denver where I taught courses in management and served as the program director of the management department. I also held a number of sales and management positions while earning my academic credentials.

Selected Publications

Books and Book Chapters

  • “Why do some technological innovations create disruptive changes for industries while others do not?” In D. R. Laube and R. F. Zammuto (Eds.),Business Driven Information Technology: Answers to 100 Critical Questions for Every Manager Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. 2003, (with Zammuto, R.F.)

Current Research

  • Broadly stated, my research is aimed at making a significant contribution to the understanding of organizational success (i.e., discovering the deep reasons underlying long-term/sustained organizational success by developing a better understanding of what constitutes organizational success).

Selected Consulting Experience/Professional Services

Textbook Reviews (Manuscripts)

  • Carpenter, Mason A., and Wm. Gerard Sanders. Strategic Management: A Dynamic Perspective, 1st ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education. (Completed May 24, 2004)

Textbook Reviews (Published)

  • Jones, Gareth R. 2004. Organization Theory, Design, and Change: Text and Cases, 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education. (Completed February 22, 2005)
  • Dess, Gregory G., G. T. Lumpkin, and Alan B. Eisner. 2006. Strategic Management: Text and Cases, 2nd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2006. (Completed February, 28, 2005)

Continuing Educations and Profesional Development Activities

I make a conscious effort to improve my teaching by regularly revising and updating my courses so that their content reflects germane changes in industry practices and critical advancements in knowledge. Activities that I engage in to keep up-to-date on current business trends, the advancement of knowledge in my field, and other relevant changes in my area of instruction include:

  • regularly reading popular press, business-type periodicals (e.g., Fortune, Business Week, the Denver Business Journal, Colorado Business Magazine, and the Wall Street Journal)
  • regularly reading scholarly/academic journals (e.g., Harvard Business Review and Academy of Management Executive)
  • regularly attending seminars and colloquiums congruent with my area of instruction.

Noteworthy examples of seminars and colloquiums that I attended over the past 5 years are outlined below.

During the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002, I attended the following seminars and colloquiums:

  • Howell, Llewellyn D. “Political Risk, Terrorism, and Globalization.” Executive Roundtable, Institute for International Business, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 16 September 2002.
  • Guild, Wendy. “Leisure’s Labor: How work gets done at a California Ski Resort.” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 25 September 2002.
  • Fiol, Marlena and Ed O’Connor. “Identification in virtual teams: From imported to homegrown we-ness.” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 13 November 2002.
  • Zodroga, Frank. “The Search for More Sustainable and Responsible Business Practices: A Focus on Mexico.” International Executive Roundtable, Institute for International Business, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 18 November 2002.

During the period January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003, I attended the following seminars and colloquiums:

  • Cascio, Wayne and Clifford E. Young. “Work-Family Balance: Does the Market Reward Firms That Respect It?” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 19 February 2003.
  • Kovoor-Misra, Sarah and Marlene A. Smith. “Openness to Organizational Identity Change: Some Antecedents & Consequences.” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 23 April 2003.
  • Rutherford, Jan R. “Business Development and Internalization Issues at Thomson MICROMEDEX.” International Executive Roundtable, Institute for International Business, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 5 November 2003.
  • Zammuto, Ray. “Bringing Technology Back In: Information Technology and Organization Theory.” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 19 November 2003.

During the period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004, I attended the following seminars and colloquiums:

  • Sarson, Yolanda. “ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS THE NEXUS OF INDIVIDUAL AND OPPORTUNITY: A STRUCTURATION VIEW.” The Business School Management Research Seminar Series, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 6 October 2004.
  • Widmer, Peter. “European Union.” International Executive Roundtable, Institute for International Business, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. Denver, CO. 3 November 2004.

Another step that I take to improve my teaching is to participate in both on-site and online courses, workshops, or seminars that are specifically designed to foster professional development and/or teaching effectiveness. Noteworthy examples of on-site and online courses, workshops, and seminars that I participated in over the past 5 years are outlined below.

During the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002, I participated in the following courses, workshops, or seminars:

  • I participated in the annual “Teaching Effectiveness” workshop; a workshop sponsored by the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Faculty Development, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center. The workshop was held on February 15, 2002 from 8:30 A.M. – 3:30 P.M. The title: “Workshop on Higher Level Thinking and Self-Assessment.”

During the period January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003, I participated in the following courses, workshops, or seminars:

  • “ID 2003 NEW eCollege Instructional Design Tutorial – eCourse AU.” Fall 2003. (A self-study, online course/tutorial for faculty, offered through eCollege.)

During the period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2004, I participated in the following courses, workshops, or seminars:

  • “Sexual Harassment Training.” September 2004. (A self-study, online course on sexual harassment offered through the University Leadership Development Institute.)
  • “AU+ Student Orientation Course (April 2004) – eCourse AU.” Fall 2004 (A self-study, online course/tutorial for students offered through eCollege.)
  • “CU Online Faculty Resource Center – eCourse AU.” Fall 2004. (A self-study, online course/tutorial for faculty, offered through eCollege.)
  • “ID 2004 Instructional Design Tutorial (April 2004) – eCourse AU.” Fall 2004 (A self-study, online course/tutorial for faculty, offered through eCollege.)

Student Clubs and Organizations

  • Faculty Sponsor, Beta Gamma Sigma (the honor society for AACSB accredited business programs), University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center Chapter, November 22, 2002 – Present.
  • Faculty Advisor, Phi Chi Theta (the national business fraternity for students in business and economics), University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center Chapter, August 12, 2003 – September 1, 2005.
  • Faculty Advisor, SHRM Phi Chi Theta (the national business fraternity for students in business and economics), University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center Chapter, August 1, 2005 – Present.

Achievements and Honors

  • 2004 Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching, the Business School at the University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center.
  • Beta Gamma Sigma, elected to membership (i.e., honorary faculty membership), November 16, 2001.
  • Golden Key National Honor Society
University of Colorado Denver

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