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Pharmacology PhD Program

Neuropharmacology


Bioinformatics

Faculty within the Pharmacology department working in the area of neuroscience and neuropharmacology focus their research in characterizing the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie neuronal function and survival. Because neuroscience/neuropharmacology is an increasingly integrative discipline, research at UCD utilizes many different core facilities and crosses departmental boundaries. One of the strengths of our faculty lies in the fact that they have experience in a number of different scientific disciplines.

Specific areas of neuropharmacology research at UCD includes the study of molecular memory and synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival and apoptosis, neuronal signal transduction, and neuropharmacology. In addition the pharmacology faculty has a particularly strong interest in the neuropharmacology of drugs of abuse.

Associated Faculty

Assistant Professor
Ph.D., 2009, Univ. of California, Berkley
We are interested in dissecting the distinct functions of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders and addiction in the context of disease-relevant brain circuits. Using cutting-edge multidisciplinary techniques, we are able to interrogate these molecules with cell-type and synapse-specific resolution.
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., 2009, Columbia University
Molecular Mechanisms of ion channel function. Examining structural and regulatory mechanisms of the Acid-sensing ion channels using electrophysiology, fluorescence, spectroscopy, and structural biology.
Associate Professor
Ph.D., 1996, Heinrich-Pette-Institute
Molecular memory mechanisms in cellular signal transduction and neuronal function; CaMKII and Ca2+ signaling.
Associate Professor
M.D./Ph.D., 1995, Baylor College of Medicine
Mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and impacts of development and epilepsy.
Professor and Vice Chairman
Ph.D., 1995, Harvard Univ.
Organization of signaling complexes by protein kinase and phosphatase anchoring proteins; mechanisms regulating neuronal second messenger signaling in synaptic plasticity.
Professor
M.D., 1969, Harvard Univ.
The dynamic role of dopamine in movement; neural transplantation for Parkinson’s disease.
Professor
M.D., 1972, Harvard Univ.
Central nervous system physiology and pharmacology and its application to clinical psychiatry.
Professor
Ph.D., 1974, City Univ. of New York
Neuropharmacology; mechanisms of alcohol tolerance, dependence, and craving; genetic aspects of alcohol dependence and affective disorders; biochemical/molecular biological/genetic analysis of CNS receptors and signal transduction systems.
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., 2003, Univ. of Washington
Molecular mechanisms of activity-triggered synaptic remodeling.
Professor
Ph.D., 1988, Moscow State Univ.
Epigenetics, phosphoinositide signaling, structural biology, NMR and crystal structures of proteins implicated in cancer, structure based drug design.
Associate Professor
Ph.D., 1988, Univ. of Washington
Signaling through calcium channels in neurons.
Associate Professor
Ph.D., 1996, Univ. of Bremen
Animal Imaging (MRI, PET, CT); Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) based metabonomics; Cancer Metabolism and Physiology; Anti-Cancer Drugs; Ischemia/Reperfusion in Organs.
Professor
Ph.D., 1983, Case Western Reserve Univ.
Neurogenomics; disease gene discovery; human genome evolution and variation.
Associate Professor
M.D./Ph.D., 1995, Baylor College of Medicine
Mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and impacts of development and epilepsy.
University Distinguished Professor and Vice Chancellor for Research
Ph.D., 1971, Johns Hopkins Univ.
Neuroscience, cerebrovascular physiology, stroke, cardiac arrest/CPR, respiration, cardiopulmonary physiology.

Contact

David Port, Program Director
Email: David Port, Ph.D.
Shanelle Felder, Program Administrator
Voice: 303-724-3565 | Fax: 303-724-3663 | Email:grad.pharm@ucdenver.edu
12800 E. 19th Avenue, Mail Stop 8303, Research Complex 1 North Tower, Room 6106, Aurora, CO 80045

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