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Project Description
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Method
  
Disease or Symptom
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
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Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a common symptom of many urologic and gastrointestinal disorders including interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Our group was at the forefront of the research efforts aimed at understanding the mechanisms underlying co-morbid CPP disorders and provided initial evidence that cross-sensitization via neural pathways triggers the development of neurogenic inflammation in the pelvis and chronic pelvic pain of unknown etiology. We determined that transient colonic inflammation causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction evaluated by cystometry, triggers hyperexcitability of bladder sensory and spinal neurons, increases pro-inflammatory neuropeptides in the bladder, and alters detrusor contractility.
Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - Adult, Pharmacology and Physiology, SurgeryAdultsNo
  
My lab studies the microbiome in humans and animal models and in a variety of disease contexts.  
Child-Maternal Health and Reproductive Sciences, Health Care and Public Health Research, Immunology and Autoimmune Diseases, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Microbiology and Infectious DiseasesAdults, Hispanic-Latino(a), Infants, Pregnant WomenNo
  
Project 1. Our preliminary studies have shown that inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction are evident in patients with chronic kidney dysfunction (CKD). At the current time, there is an immediate need for specific and sensitive biomarkers that can predict disease progression and stratify patients to those at risk to progress faster. With no approved treatment, control of hypertension and management of secondary features of chronic renal insufficiency are present clinical measures to slow the progression of disease.  Project 2: Calcineurin inhibitors are highly effective immunosuppressants used in patients with immune diseases and after transplantation. However, their use is limited by their toxic effects on the kidney and the induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Current clinical diagnostic markers are known to be insensitive and to only rise after significant damage has already occurred. The proposed study seeks to establish that the negative effects of the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus on kidney and vascular endothelial cells in adult and pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome and after kidney transplantation are reflected by changes in plasma and urine metabolite and protein pattern changes and that these changes have better sensitivity and specificity compared to markers currently established in the clinic such as creatinine in serum.
Cardiovascular, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Pharmacology and PhysiologyAdults, School Age Children, Young AdultsNo
  
This project is to explore development of and potential treatment of autoimmune diseases. We focus on type 1 diabetes and MS predominantly, but are beginning to study the role of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis and cardio-vascular disease. We do translational and reverse translational work. That is, we study how immune cells work in mice and identify the counterparts in human subjects, including autoimmune subjects. We also explore human disease states and determine if we can reverse translate to create appropriate mouse models for further study. The lab has generated a unique drug to control autoimmune inflammation and we are exploring how this drug may translate to T1D, MS and CVD.
Cardiovascular, Immunology and Autoimmune DiseasesNo
  
Hematology and OncologyNo
  
Olfactory disturbances are early symptoms of many neurodegenerative diseases. Our lab examines the circuitry underlying cholinergic modulation of olfactory discrimination. We examine the cross-talk between dopaminergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic neurons in the bulb and basal forebrain.
Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - Adult, Pharmacology and PhysiologyNo
  
A small number of studies have suggested that, like adults, youth with anxiety disorders experience strikingly elevated rates of sleep problems, particularly insomnia. However, little is known about how insomnia impacts the clinical expression of anxiety disorders or the underlying neural abnormalities implicated in anxiety. This is a critical issue, because if insomnia is found to be a causal or maintaining factor in anxiety, it becomes an important target for the treatment of anxiety. Currently, no studies have examined whether the neural abnormalities exhibited by adults or youth with anxiety are associated with sleep loss. The current study seeks to identify the neural system abnormalities at the core of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and examine their relationships with sleep. It employs samples of adolescents with and without GAD, and pairs naturalistic, objective measurement of sleep with functional neuroimaging assessment of the neural circuitry involved in threat reactivity and attentional control.
Developmental Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - childAdolescentsNo
  
http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/obgyn/Divisions/reprosciences/Pages/Behbakht-Lab.aspxBehbakht, KianCancer CenterCurrentYes
  
http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/medicine/MedicalOncology/research/Pages/MessersmithResearchLab.aspxMessersmith, WellsCancer CenterCurrentYes
  
https://som.ucdenver.edu/Profiles/Faculty/Profile/9299Vibhakar, RajeevCancer CenterCurrentYes
  
Gliomas are the most aggressive brain tumors, with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) being the deadliest among them (the average of 6 months survival after diagnosis). These fast growing tumors usually cannot be cured. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard-of-care method to diagnose these tumors. Prior to treatment MRI provides superior detection, localization, and tumor visualization. Immediately after treatment - consisting of surgical resection, radiation treatment (RT) and chemotherapy - MRI cannot be used to assess the residual glioma because the treatment alone induce "abnormal" scans due to inflammation and surgical intervention. This radiological occurrence is called “pseudo-progression” (PsP). PsP causes MRI abnormaities (mimicking tumor progression) up to 12 weeks after completion of treatment. To achieve the best possible prognosis for glioma patients there is urgent need for noninvasive radiological discrimination of PsP vs true progression within these 12 weeks. We have shown, with both in vitro and animal studies, that glioma tumor cells have high amino acid up-take, while inflammatory cells have high iron up-take. The goal of this study is to evaluate noninvasive imaging in mouse glioma models utilizing (i) radioactive amino acids by positron emission tomography (PET) to detect early onset of tumor progression; and (ii) iron-based contrast by MRI to selectively image sites of inflammation due to treatment. This PET/MRI approach should reveal the molecular differences of progression and PsP which can be readily translated to humans. Swift detection of recurrence will allow for time critical decisions regarding additional therapeutic interventions in cases of progression potentially improving overall survival.
Hematology and Oncology, Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - AdultAnimal Models, ImagingCancer, Neurological IllnessAnesthesiology12631 East 17th Ave AO1, L15-2015 Aurora, CO 80045303 724 1086Natalie.Serkova@UCDenver.eduhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/centers/cancercenter/Research/sharedresources/AnimalImaging/Pages/AnimalImaging.aspxSerkova, NatalieAnesthesiology, Cancer CenterCurrentNo
  
The mission of our NIH funded laboratory (The Translational PharmacoNutrition Pharmacology Laboratory (TPN Lab) is to discover and develop the use of new therapeutic agents to improve outcomes from acute illness, injury, and surgery. This research spans the entire range of translational pharmacology (from basic mechanistic pathway determination in cellular/animal systems to large multi-center randomized controlled clinical trials).   Currently, we have a major research focus on the use of nutrition, including specific nutrients  (glutamine and other sports and performance-enhancing nutrients) and probiotics/microbiome interventions as therapeutic agents in improving outcomes from surgery, critical illness, trauma, burn, organ injury, and peri-operative stress. Other areas of interest for our research group include development of coordinated peri-operative interventions (exercise, nutrition, etc.) to improve surgical and burn outcomes.  A student in our fast paced and diverse lab group would be encouraged to develop an independent sub-project within our areas of interest, work on a sub-project of our ongoing clinical trials or select a personalized basic (cellular/animal) science project that would become their own project. The project would be chosen with the intent to lead to publication of abstracts, manuscripts, and presentation at national and international meetings. The student could expect to not only acquire fundamental research skills, but also extensive training in literature research, abstract/paper writing, and oral presentation skills.
SurgeryClinical Trials, NutritionBasic Human Processes, StressAnesthesiologyUniversity of Colorado School of Medicine 12700 E. 19th Ave. Box 8602, RC2 P15-7120 | Aurora, CO 80045303-724-4747Paul.Wischmeyer@ucdenver.eduWischmeyer, PaulCancer CenterCurrentNo8/4/2015 9:02 AM
  
50-80% of our body immune cells reside at our mucosal tissues. In particular our intestines are in a constant state of immune activation as they regulate the food and bacterial contents of our guts while maintaining physiologic function. This immune tolerance; is broken during the development of the autoimmune diseases such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD; namely, Crohn's disease and Ulcerative Colitis). We principally focus on dissecting the roles that cytokine, chemokine and miRNA networks play in regulating intestinal tolerance versus the progression to IBD. A central theme is to identify innovative approaches to target the break in mucosal immune tolerance, which drives pathogenic CD4+ Helper T cell subsets. Our ultimate goal is to translate our preclinical research into new therapeutic modalities for patients with IBD.
Immunology and Autoimmune DiseasesAnimal Models, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and Genetics, Imaging, Light MicroscopyGastrointestinal Disease, Immune Related DiseaseAnesthesiologyOffice # 7118, Research Center 2, Anschutz Medical Campus3037241762eoin.mcnamee@ucdenver.eduhttp://profiles.ucdenver.edu/display/226064McNamee, Eoin (*Owen)AnesthesiologyClosedNo8/21/2015 12:32 PM
  
The inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway are proliferation inhibitors and as such used as immunosuppressants in transplantation, as anticancer agents and on drug-eluting coronary stents. Clinically used mTOR inhibotors are Sirolimus, Everolimus and Zotarolimus. These have a very complex drug metabolism with many of these metabolites raching significant concentrations in blood. Interestingly, the anti-proliferative and other biological activities of these metabolites are mostly unknown. This project will isolate the major metabolites. Their structures will be identified and their biological activities will be tested.
Cardiovascular, Immunology and Autoimmune Diseases, Pharmacology and PhysiologyBiomolecular Structure and Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and GeneticsCancer, Heart DiseaseAnesthesiologyBioscience 2, Suite 200 12705 East Montview Boulevard Aurora, CO 80045-7109303-7245-665uwe.christians@ucdenver.eduhttp://www.bioanalytics.usChristians, UweAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects approximately 1.6 million people in the USA. These chronic illnesses are characterized by loss of intestinal epithelial cell integrity and pathogenic CD4T cell accumulation in the inflamed intestine. This project seeks to investigate how proteins produced at the epithelial cell surface regulate intestinal epithelial barrier function and the recruitment of pathogenic CD4T cells to the intestine. In vitro cell culture models and mouse models of intestinal inflammation will be used to study these processes.
Immunology and Autoimmune DiseasesAdultsAnimal Models, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and GeneticsGastrointestinal Disease, Immune Related DiseaseAnesthesiology12700 E 19th Avenue RC-2303-724-6245carol.aherne@ucdenver.eduhttps://profiles.ucdenver.edu/display/226074Aherne, CarolAnesthesiologyCurrentNo8/24/2015 11:15 AM
  
Project 1. Our preliminary studies have shown that inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction are evident in patients with chronic kidney dysfunction (CKD). At the current time, there is an immediate need for specific and sensitive biomarkers that can predict disease progression and stratify patients to those at risk to progress faster. With no approved treatment, control of hypertension and management of secondary features of chronic renal insufficiency are present clinical measures to slow the progression of disease.  Project 2: Calcineurin inhibitors are highly effective immunosuppressants used in patients with immune diseases and after transplantation. However, their use is limited by their toxic effects on the kidney and the induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction. Current clinical diagnostic markers are known to be insensitive and to only rise after significant damage has already occurred. The proposed study seeks to establish that the negative effects of the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus on kidney and vascular endothelial cells in adult and pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome and after kidney transplantation are reflected by changes in plasma and urine metabolite and protein pattern changes and that these changes have better sensitivity and specificity compared to markers currently established in the clinic such as creatinine in serum.
Cardiovascular, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Pharmacology and PhysiologyAdults, School Age Children, Young AdultsBiomolecular Structure and Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and Genetics, Clinical TrialsKidney, Bladder, and Urethral Disease, Liver DiseaseAnesthesiologyBioscience II Building 12705 E Montview Blvd, Suite 200, Room 2304 Aurora, CO, 80045303-724-5669Jelena.Klawitter@ucdenver.eduKlawitter, JalenaAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Our studies investigate how modulation of T-type calcium channels in peripheral sensory and CNS neurons affects their function and how different anesthetic and analgesic agents selectively target particular classes of voltage-gated ion channels. In particular, we are interested in testing new selective T-type channel blockers such as neuroactive steroids using functional studies of nociception and anesthetic end points in vivo. In these studies we will use mice lacking particular isoforms of T-type calcium channels, namely CaV3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 and our established animal models of painful diabetic neuropathy.
Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - Adult, Pharmacology and PhysiologyAnimal Models, BehavioralDiabetes, PainAnesthesiologyroom L18-4100 RC1 south303-724-9122slobodan.todorovic@ucdenver.eduTodorovic, SlobodanAnesthesiologyCurrentNo5/25/2016 9:45
  
Countless basic science studies have shown that animals exposed to anesthesia during early development exhibit long-term changes in both behavior and cognition, a process known as anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity.  In addition to clinical research investigating the effects of anesthesia on children, basic research focused on identifying the mechanisms behind anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity are necessary for patient safety.  Microglia are the immune cells of the brain, but during early development they are also important for promoting and supporting neurons to ensure normal brain development.  No prior studies have directly investigated the effect of anesthesia on microglia.  Therefore, we utilize sevoflurane, a common anesthetic used in children, and study its effect on microglial development in a neonatal animal model.  Utilizing advanced techniques in immunology and microscopy, we characterize microglial morphology and function after anesthesia and evaluate for microglial-dependent mechanisms of anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity.
Developmental Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - childAnimal Models, Behavioral, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and Genetics, Light Microscopy, NeuroimagingMental Illness and Developmental Disabilities, Neurological IllnessAnesthesiologyRC 1 South, Rm 4101303-724-9053christine.zanghi@ucdenver.eduZanghi, ChristineAnesthesiologyCurrentNo5/25/2016 14:18
  
Patients who receive femoral nerve catheter with single injection sciatic nerve block will have lower post-operative pain scores at 24, 48 and 72 hours than patients who receive femoral nerve catheter alone. Background and Significance: The proposed project will seek to determine a gold-standard method of pain management after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the pediatric population. ACL ruptures are a common injury among young patients. Approximately 17.97 ACL reconstruction procedures per 100,000 person-years are performed in patients younger than 20 in the United States each year. Despite advancements in minimally invasive arthroscopic surgical approaches, postoperative pain following ACL reconstruction remains a concern. Regional anesthesia is increasingly employed as an adjunct to general anesthesia during outpatient orthopaedic procedures. A recent systematic review of 75 Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) found that regional anesthesia blocks generally decreased postoperative pain following ACL reconstruction. However, only 1 of these 75 studies considered the effects of regional anesthesia on the pediatric population. Moreover, it has been found that pediatric patients report greater pain and anxiety than adults 24 hours after ACL surgery. Thus, the efficacy of regional anesthesia on the pediatric population remains unclear. This study will seek to establish FNC or FNC+SNB as the gold-standard for perioperative pain management of pediatric patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. Methods: Study design - A prospective RCT will be used to determine the efficacy of regional anesthesia on postoperative pain management in the pediatric population following ACL reconstruction. The RCT will be comprised of two arms: FNC or FNC+SNB The primary aim of the study is to determine if patients who receive femoral nerve catheter with single injection sciatic nerve block will have lower pain scores than patients who receive femoral nerve catheter alone. Secondary aims include comparing total rescue pain medication administered and patient satisfaction between the two groups. The procedure will be performed by a sports medicine surgeon and an anesthesiologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Data will be collected for pediatric patients (ages 8-18) undergoing ACL reconstruction.
Bone or SkeletalAdolescents, School Age ChildrenClinical Trials, Surveys, Questionnaires, and Psychological TestingBone or SkeletalAnesthesiology13123 E. 16th Ave. 720-777-4587tessa.mandler@childrenscolorado.orgMandler, TessaAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Developmental Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - child, Neuroscience, Brain and Behavior - AdultAdults, School Age ChildrenAnimal Models, Behavioral, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and GeneticsAgingAnesthesiologyMailstop: 8321; 12800 E. 19th Ave., Aurora CO 80045303-724-6628paco.herson@ucdenver.eduHerson, PacoAnesthesiology, PharmacologyCurrentNo
  
AnesthesiologyBartels, KarstenAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
AnesthesiologyClendenen, NathanAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/Research/labs/Dr.%20Dabertrand%20Lab/Pages/default.aspxDabertrand, FabriceAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/faculty/Pages/ecklet.aspxEckle, TobiasAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
AnesthesiologyFernandez-Bustamante, AnaAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/Research/labs/Dr.%20Herson%20lab/Pages/default.aspxHerson, PacoAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/Research/labs/Dr-Jamie-Peters/Pages/default.aspxPeters, JamieAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/Research/labs/Dr.%20Quillinan%20lab/Pages/default.aspxQuillinan, NidiaAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
Anesthesiologyhttp://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/Anesthesiology/Research/labfacilities/Dr.%20Slobodan%20Todorovic%20lab/Pages/default.aspxTodorovic, SlobodanAnesthesiologyCurrentYes
  
 
 ​Please see Kieft Lab Website for descriptions of the many projects going on in the lab. http://www.medschool.ucdenver.edu/KieftLab
Microbiology and Infectious DiseasesBiomolecular Structure and Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and GeneticsBiochemistry and Molecular Genetics12801 East 17th Ave, Research 1 South303-724-3257jeffrey.kieft@ucdenver.eduhttp://www.medschool.ucdenver.edu/KieftLabKieft, JeffreyBiochemistry and Molecular GeneticsClosedNo
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