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Program Meeting Schedule



Presented by the Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine

and the Aspen Lung Conference

Sponsored by the University of Colorado School of Medicine

Office of Continuing Medical Education


Printer-friendly version of theprogram meeting schedule​.​

 

5:00-7:00 PM

Evening Registration Reception

Gant Conference Center​​


 

8:00-8:05 AM

Welcome/Introduction

Irina Petrache, M.D., Chair

R. William Vandivier, M.D., Chair

Moumita Ghosh, Ph.D., Co-Chair


8:05-8:10 AM

The Thomas L. Petty Aspen Lung Conference:  A Historical Perspective

Dennis E. Doherty, M.D., FCCP /Professor of Medicine/University of Kentucky

Secretary/Treasurer, National Lung Health Education Program


Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of COPD: Moderators - Lorraine Ware, M.D. and Jadwiga Wedzicha, M.D.

8:10-8:30 AM

THOMAS L. PETTY LECTURE

Keynote Address

“BRINGING LIGHT TO COPD PATHOGENESIS AND RESILIENCE”

Rubin M. Tuder, M.D.

Hart Family Professor of Medicine

Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine

University of Colorado School of Medicine

Anschutz Medical Campus

Aurora, Colorado​


8:30-8:40 AM

Discussion


8:40-9:10 AM

ROGER S. MITCHELL LECTURE

“TARGETING COPD PHENOTYPES, ENDOTYPES AND BIOMARKERS”

Prescott G. Woodruff, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep and Allergy

Cardiovascular Research Institute

University of California, San Francisco

San Francisco, California


​9:10-9:35 AM

Discussion


 

9:35-9:50 AM

FUNCTIONAL STUDIES OF SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS SUGGEST HETEROGENEITY IN COPD DUE TO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF DIFFERENT CELL TYPES.

Yohannes Tesfaigzi*, H. Petersen, B. Celli, C. Owen, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA.


9:50-10:05 AM   

THE COPD FREQUENT EXACERBATOR PHENOTYPE IS ASSOCIATED WITH DECREASED UPPER AIRWAY MICROBIOTA ALPHA DIVERSITY.

Alexa A. Pragman1,2*, T.J. Gould2, K. Knutson2, S. Hodgson1, R.E. Isaacson2, C.S. Reilly2, C.H. Wendt1,2, 1Minneapolis VA Medical Center and 2University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.


 

10:05-10:35 AM

Coffee Break

MEET THE PROFESSOR SESSION (by Registration table)


10:35-11:05 AM    

THOMAS A. NEFF LECTURE “APPLYING FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS TO COPD”

Edwin K. Silverman, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor of Medicine

Channing Division of Network Medicine

Harvard Medical School

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Boston, Massachusetts 


11:05-11:30 AM

Discussion


11:30-11:45 AM

RNASEQ ANALYSIS OF BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS TO IDENTIFY COPD-ASSOCIATED GENES AND SNPS.

J. Yeo1, D. Morales1, T. Chen1, E. Crawford1, X. Zhang1, T. Blomquist1, A.M. Levin2, P.P. Massion3, D. Arenberg4, D.E.Midthun5, P.J. Mazzone6, S.D. Nathan7, R.J. Wainz8, P. Nana-Sinkam9, James C. Willey1*, 1The University of Toledo; 2 Henry Ford Health System; 3Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center; 4University of Michigan; 5Mayo Clinic; 6Cleveland Clinic; 7Inova Fairfax Hospital; 8The Toledo Hospital; 9Virginia Commonwealth  University.


11:45 AM-12:00 PM

SINGLE CELL RNA SEQUENCING ANALYSIS OF Hhip+/- AGE ASSOCIATED EMPHYSEMA MODEL REVEALS CELL TYPE SPECIFIC CHANGES RELATED TO INFLAMMATORY PATHWAYS.

Jeong H. Yun*, C.H. Lee, S. Xu, P. Castaldi, C.P. Hersh, L. Pinello, X. Zhou, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA.


12:00-1:30 PM

Lunch (lunch not provided by conference)


COPD as a Disease of Accelerated Aging: Moderator – Moderators –Rubin Tuder, M.D. and Sonia Flores, Ph.D.​​

1:30-2:05 PM

STATE OF THE ART

MeiLan K. Han, M.D.

University of Michigan Health System

“Early COPD: Improving Early Detection, Prevention, and Treatment”


2:05-2:30 PM

Discussion


2:30-2:45 PM

BACK TO THE BOX: USING LUNG VOLUMES TO PREDICT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DEVELOP COPD AMONG SMOKERS.

S. Zeng, A. Tham, B. Bos, J. Jin, Mehrdad Arjomandi*,

University of California San Francisco and San Francisco VA Medical Center, California.


2:45-3:00 PM

AIRWAY EPITHELIAL GENOMIC SIGNATURES OF TYPE 2 AND IL-17 INFLAMMATMATION IDENTIFY CLINICALLY HETEROGENOUS SUBGROUPS AMONGST EVER SMOKERS IN SPIROMICS.

Suresh Garudadri1,2*, P.G. Woodruff2, M. Han3, R.G. Barr4, E. Bleecker5, R. Bowler6, A. Comellas7, C. Cooper8, G. Criner9, M. Dransfield10, N. Hansel11, R. Paine12, J. Krishnan13, S. Peters14, F. Martinez15, J. Curtis3, A. Hastie14, W. O'Neal16, D. Couper16, N.E. Alexis16, S.A. Christenson2;

1Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH;

2University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA;

3University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI;

4Columbia University, New York, NY; 

5University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ;

6National Jewish Health, Denver, CO;

7University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA;

8University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA;

9Temple University, Philadelphia, PA;

10University of Alabama, Birmingham, Birmingham, AL;

11Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD;

12University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT;

13University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, IL;

14Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC;

15 Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY;

16University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.


3:00-3:30 PM

Break (Refreshments for conference participants only) 


Metabolic and Biochemical Mechanisms of COPD Pathogenesis: Moderators – Rubin Tuder, M.D. and Sonia Flores, Ph.D.​

3:30-4:05 PM

STATE OF THE ART

Irina Petrache, M.D. 

National Jewish Health, Denver 

“Bioactive Lipids in the Pathogenesis of Airway Disease and Emphysema”


4:05-4:30 PM

Discussion


4:30-4:45 PM

OXYSTEROL GUIDED iBALT POSITIONING DRIVES CIGARETTE SMOKE-INDUCED COPD.

Thomas M. Conlon1*, J. Jia1, R.S.J. Sarker1, N.F. Smirnova1, K. Heinzelmann1, H. Bayram2, O. Eickelberg3, A.Ö. Yildirim1,

1CPC/iLBD, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany;

2School of Medicine, Koç University, Istanbul, Turkey;

3Division of Respiratory Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.​


4:45-5:00 PM

CIGARETTE SMOKE IMPAIRS FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN 5-MEDIATED RESOLUTION OF INFLAMMATION IN A  MOUSE MODEL OF COPD EXACERBATIONS.

D. Rao1, D. Phan1, A.-L. Perraud1, Fabienne Gally1*,

1Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO.​


5:00-7:00 PM

POSTER VIEWING --- SOCIAL HOUR


 
​​

Stem/Progenitor Dysfunction and Regenerative Therapies for COPD:  Moderators - Moumita Ghosh, Ph.D. and Melanie Königshoff, M.D., Ph.D.

8:00-8:35 AM

STATE OF THE ART

Barry R. Stripp, Ph.D.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

“Stem/Progenitor Cell Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of COPD”


8:35-9:00 AM

Discussion


9:00-9:15 AM

IDENTIFICATION OF A NOVEL WNT ACTIVE EPITHELIAL STEM CELL IN THE ADULT LUNG.

J.-P. Ng-Blichfeldt1,2, Yan Hu3*, C. Ota1, R. Gosens2, M. Königshoff 1,3

1Comprehensive Pneumology Center, Helmholtz-Zentrum Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, University Hospital Grosshadern, Member of the German Center of Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany;

2Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD (GRIAC), University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands;

3Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.


9:15-9:30 AM

PATIENT iPSC-DERIVED LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS AS A NOVEL MODEL FOR CIGARETTE SMOKE-INDUCED LUNG DISEASE.

K. Abo, A. Jacob, M. Vedaie, F. Hawkins, D. Kotton, Andrew Wilson*,

Center for Regenerative Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.


9:30-10:00 AM

Coffee Break

MEET THE PROFESSOR SESSION (by Registration table)


10:00-10:35 AM

STATE OF THE ART

Daniel J. Weiss, M.D., Ph.D.

University of Vermont College of Medicine

“Cell-Based Therapy for COPD: Rebuilding the Lung”


 

10:35-11:00 AM

Discussion


11:00-11:15 AM

DYSFUNCTION OF AIRWAY BASAL PROGENITORS CAN BE RESCUED BY A HEALTHY MICROENVIRONMENT: IMPLICATIONS IN REGENERATIVE THERAPY FOR SMOKING INDUCED LUNG DISEASES.

Mansi Sethi1*, A.E. Brantley1, K. Kincaid1, J. Kim2, D.T. Merrick2, R.L. Keith2,3, Y.E. Miller2,3, M. Ghosh1,2,

1National Jewish Health;

2University of Colorado;

3Denver Veteran Affairs Medical Center.


11:15-11:30 AM

BIOENGINEERED HYDROGELS TO IMPROVE THREE-DIMENSIONAL (3D) MODELS OF LUNG REGENERATION IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD).

Kolene E. Bailey1*, T.J. D'Ovidio1, G.T. Campbell3, V.M. Nguyen1,2, N. Manning1, M. Königshoff1, C.M. Magin1,2, 

1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO;

2Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO;

3School of Dental Medicine, Department of Craniofacial Biology, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.


12:00-3:00 PM

Picnic – T Lazy 7

The Ranch (for conference participants and their families)


Immune and Epithelial Cell Mechanisms of COPD Exacerbations: Moderators -R. William Vandivier, M.D. and Rachel Zemans, M.D.​

8:00-8:15 AM

Clinical Perspective

Jadwiga A. Wedzicha, M.D.

National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London

“Taming the Tiger: Burden, Consequences and Challenges of COPD Exacerbations”


8:15-8:20 AM

Discussion


8:20-8:50 AM

REUBEN M. CHERNIACK LECTURE

“COPD EXACERBATIONS AND IMMUNE DYSFUNCTION”

Alison A. Humbles, Ph.D.

Fellow Director, Department of Respiratory,

Inflammation and Autoimmunity

MedImmune, LLC

Cambridge, United Kingdom


8:50-9:15 AM

Discussion


9:15-9:30 AM

PERIPHERAL BLOOD NK CELL PHENOTYPES ASSOCIATED WITH EXACERBATION RISK IN COPD PATIENTS.

A. Osterburg, L. Lach, H. Liu, J. Flury, R. Panos, Michael Borchers*,

University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.


9:30-9:45 AM

INFLAMMATORY PHENOTYPES ASSOCIATED WITH COPD INCREASE SUSCEPTIBILITY TO EXACERBATION: LESSONS FROM SINGLE CELL ANALYSIS OF LUNG MACROPHAGES.

Sreelakshmi Vasudevan*, J. Vasquez, W. Chen, M. Arjomandi,

University of California San Francisco, CA.


9:45-10:15 AM

Coffee Break

MEET THE PROFESSOR SESSION (by Registration table)


10:15-10:50 AM

MARVIN I. SCHWARZ LECTURE

“EPITHELIAL-IMMUNE CELL INTERACTIONS IN COPD AND COPD EXACERBATIONS”

Michael J. Holtzman, M.D.

Selma and Herman Seldin Professor of Internal Medicine

Director, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Washington University School of Medicine

St. Louis, Missouri


10:50-11:15 AM

Discussion


11:15-11:30 AM

P73 IS REQUIRED FOR PIGR EXPRESSION IN THE RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

Bradley W. Richmond1*, R.-H. Du1, C. Marshall2, J. Pietenpol2, V.V. Polosukhin1, T.S. Blackwell1,

1Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN;

2Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.


11:30-11:45 AM

SHARED MECHANISMS BETWEEN NEUTROPHIL FUNCTIONS, MULTI-MORBIDITY AND FRAILTY IN COPD.

G.M. Walton, D. Wilson, W. Drew, A. McGuinness, R.A. Stockley, Elizabeth Sapey*,

Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, University of Birmingham,UK.


11:45-1:30 PM

Lunch (lunch not provided by conference)


Metabolic and Biochemical Mechanisms of COPD Pathogenesis: Moderators – Susan Majka, Ph.D. and
Karina Serban, M.D.​

1:30-2:05 PM

PARKER B. FRANCIS LECTURESHIP

"MITOCHONDRIAL AND METABOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF COPD”

Augustine M.K. Choi, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean

Weill Cornell Medicine

New York, New York


2:05-2:30 PM

Discussion


2:30-2:45 PM

DEFECTIVE CELLULAR ENERGETICS IN COPD MACROPHAGES

Eilise M. Ryan*, R. Budd, P. Coelho, M.A. Bewley, W. Rumsey, Y. Sanchez, G. Choudhury, J.B. McCafferty, D.H. Dockrell, S.R Walmsley, M.K.B. Whyte,

University of Edinburgh, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, MRC Centre Inflammation Research, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.


2:45-3:00 PM

FROM DICTYOSTELIUM TO HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIUM: ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE TRANSLOCASE ENHANCES CELLULAR RESPIRATION AND CILIARY FUNCTION DISRUPTED BY CIGARETTE SMOKE.

Jennifer M. K. Nguyen1,2*, C.R. Kliment1,3, Y.W. Lu4, S.M. Claypool4, S. Raychaudhuri1, S. Watanabe1, P.A. Iglesias5, V.K. Sidhaye3, D.N. Robinson1,2,6,

1Department of Cell Biology;

2Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences;

3Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care;

4Department of Physiology;

5Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; 

6Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering,

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.


3:00-3:30 PM

Break (Refreshments for conference participants only)


COPD as a Disease of Accelerated Aging: Moderators – Susan Majka, Ph.D. and Karina Serban, M.D.​

3:30-4:05 PM

STATE OF THE ART

Jonathan K. Alder, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

“Role of Senescence in COPD Pathogenesis”


4:05-4:30 PM

Discussion


4:30-4:45 PM

AGE ASSOCIATED CHANGES IN EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS IN THE LUNG ARE ALSO PRESENT IN SEVERE COPD.

Corry-Anke Brandsma1,2*, V. Guryev2,3, W. Timens1,2, D.S. Postma2,4, R. Bischoff5, J. Malm6,7, G. Marko-Varga6, M. van den Berge2,4, P. Horvatovich5,

1University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, Groningen, The Netherlands;

2University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen Research Institute for Asthma and COPD, Groningen, The Netherlands;

3European Research Institute for the Biology of Ageing, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands;

4University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Groningen, The Netherlands;

5University of Groningen, Department of Analytical Biochemistry, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, Groningen, The Netherlands; 

6Lund University, Center of Excellence in Biological and Medical Mass Spectrometry, Biomedical Center, Lund, Sweden;

7Lund University, Department of Translational Medicine, Malmö, Sweden.​


4:45-5:00 PM

miR-24 PROTECTS AGAINST CIGARETTE SMOKE-MEDIATED CELL DEATH AND AIRSPACE ENLARGEMENT, BUT IS DECREASED IN COPD.

E. Finnemore, P. Shan, J. Gomez, N. Kaminski, P. Lee, Maor Sauler*,

Yale School of Medicine, Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, New Haven, CT.​


5:00-7:00 PM

POSTER VIEWING – Wine and Cheese Reception


 

Consequences of COPD Beyond the Obstructed Lung: Moderator - Moderators -York Miller, M.D. and Brian Graham, M.D.​

8:00-8:30 AM

GILES F. FILLEY LECTURE

"COPD AND LUNG CANCER: COMMON PATHOGENESIS”

A. McGarry Houghton, M.D.

Associate Professor of Medicine

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine

University of Washington School of Medicine

Seattle, Washington


8:30-8:50 AM

Discussion


8:50-9:05 AM

COPD PHENOTYPE DICTATES CANCER-PROMOTING STROMAL GENE EXPRESSION PROGRAMS.

Chris H. Wendt1,5*, B.J. Sandri1, L. Masvidal2, C. Murie2, M. Bartish2, S. Avdulov1, L. Higgins3, T. Markowski3, M. Peterson1, J. Bergh2, P. Yang4, C. Rolny2, A.H. Limper4, T.J. Griffin3, P.B. Bitterman1, O. Larsson2,

1Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN;

2Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden;

3Department of Biochemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN;

4Mayo Clinic, Rochester; 5Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.


9:05-9:20 AM

THE ROLE OF IGSF3 IN CELL ADHESION, PROLIFERATION, CELL MIGRATION.

Kelly Schweitzer1*, K. Ni1, S. Jacobson1, I. Bronova1, E. Berdyshev1, R. Bowler1,2, I. Petrache1,2,

1National Jewish Health, Department of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Denver, CO;

2University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.


9:20-9:50 AM

Coffee Break


9:50-10:20 AM

STATE OF THE ART

Norbert Weissmann, Ph.D.

University of Giessen, Justus Liebig University Giessen

“COPD and Pulmonary Vascular Disease: Comorbidity in Search of a Treatment”


10:20-10:40 AM

Discussion


10:40-10:55 AM

IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL MESENCHYMAL PATHWAYS THAT INITIATE EMPHYSEMA.

C.F. Gaskill1, J.A. Kropski1, B.W. Richmond1, R.F. Foronjy2, M.M. Taketo3, Susan M. Majka1*,

1Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN;

2SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn, NY; 3Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.


10:55-11:10 AM

GENERATION OF ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN KNOCKOUT AND PI*ZZ FERRETS USING CRISPR/CAS9: A GENETIC MODEL OF EMPHYSEMA

N. He1, Bradley H. Rosen1,2*, J.S. Gray1, I.A. Evans1, M. Zieger3, Z. Yan1, F. Borel3, B. Liang1, X. Sun1, S.R. Moll1, M.H. Brodsky3, C. Mueller3, J.F. Engelhardt1,2,

1Anatomy and Cell Biology and 2Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA;

3Pediatrics, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA.


11:10-11:25 AM

NHLBI Perspective

Thomas L. Croxton, Ph.D., M.D.

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, Division of Lung Diseases

“NHLBI Critical Challenges and Compelling Questions for COPD: Moving the Field Forward”


11:25-11:30 AM

Discussion


11:30-12:30 PM

CONFERENCE SUMMARY

“Divining the Future for COPD Research”

Stephen I. Rennard, M.D.

Professor of Medicine

University of Nebraska

Head, Clinical Discovery Unit

AstraZeneca

Cambridge, United Kingdom


12:30-1:00 PM

Discussion and Adjourn


 

POSTER VIEWING - SOCIAL HOUR
Wednesday, June 6, 2018
5:00-7:00 PM


 

POSTERS

FRAILTY ASSESSMENT FOR PREDICTING READMISSION AND DISCHARGE DISPOSITION IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE.  Nima Toosizadeh1,2*, L. Ghazala1, T. Golden1, J. Mohler1,2, 1 Arizona Center on Aging, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

DIVERSITY OF RESPIRATORY IMPEDANCE BASED ON QUANTITATIVE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN PATIENTS WITH COPD.  Yoshiaki Kitaguchi1*, Y. Wada1, M. Yasuo1, F. Ueno1,  S. Kawakami2, K. Fukushima3, K. Fujimoto4, M. Hanaoka, 1First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan; 2Department of Radiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Genbaku Isahaya Hospital, Isahaya, Nagasaki, Japan; 4Departments of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan.

LUNG PATHOPHYSIOLOGY IN THREE DIMENSIONS: INTRODUCING HUMAN ‘SMALL AIRWAY-ON-A-CHIP’Kambez H. Benam*, D. Phil, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO.

IMPACT OF EMPHSYEMA DISTRIBUTION ON THE NATURAL COURSE OF COPD. Ji-Hyun Lee1*, E.-K. Kim1, M.-A. Kim1, J. Park1, T.-H. Kim2, Y.-M. Oh3, S.-D. Lee3, for the KOLD Study Group, 1Department of Pulmonology, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University;  2Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine.

COMPARISON OF OSCILLOMETRY WITH SPIROMETRY IN DETECTION OF SMALL AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION.  Q.W. Huang, E. Cho, C. Ryan, J. Tikkanen, J. Lipton, Chung-Wai Chow*, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL COMPOUNDS FOR WNT/β-CATENIN INDUCED LUNG REPAIR IN COPDRita Costa1*, D.E. Wagner1, M.M. De Santis1, K.E. Bailey2, A. Doryab1, K. Schorpp3, I. Rothenaigner3, C. Ota1, H.A. Baarsma1, M. Campillos4, K. Hadian3, M. Königshoff1,2, 1Comprehensive Pneumology Center (CPC), Helmholtz Zentrum München and University Hospital of the Ludwig Maximilians University, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany; 2University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Aurora, CO; 3Institute of Molecular Toxicology and Pharmacology, Assay Development and Screening Platform, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany; 4Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Systems Biology of small molecules, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich, Germany.

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN SMOKERS WITHOUT EVIDENCE OF SMOKING-RELATED LUNG DISEASE. Margaret Ragland1*, B. Make2, J. Hokanson3, 1University of Colorado School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Aurora, CO; 2National Jewish Health, Denver, CO; 3University of Colorado School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Aurora, CO.

PCP SIGNALING IS A MEDIATOR OF EPITHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN CHRONIC INFLAMMATORY AIRWAY DISEASE Eszter K. Vladar1,2*, C.E. Milla3, J.D. Axelrod1, 1Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA; 2Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO (current address); Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

LONG-TERM ANNUAL CHANGE IN FEV1 IN ESTABLISHED CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. Masaharu Nishimura*, M. Suzuki, H. Makita, S. Konno, for the Hokkaido COPD cohort study investigators, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

COMPARATIVE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF SMALL AIRWAYS IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AND CONSTRICTIVE BRONCHIOLITIS. Vasiliy V. Polosukhin1*, B.W. Richmond1, R.-H. Du1, L.B. Ware1, J.W. Lee2, A. Harris3, R.F. Miller1, T.S. Blackwell1, 1Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN; 2Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA; 3Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.

A PERSONALIZED BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF DYSPNEA, ADHERENCE AND DEPRESSION IN COPD. Richard S. Novitch1*, G.S. Alexopoulos2, 1Burke Rehabilitation Hospital and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; 2Weill Cornell Institute for Geriatric Psychiatry, White Plains, NY.

AMPLIFY: A RANDOMIZED, PHASE III STUDY EVALUATING THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ACLIDINIUM/FORMOTEROL VERSUS MONOTHERAPY IN PATIENT WITH COPD.  S. Sethi1, E. Kerwin2, H. Watz3, G.T. Ferguson4, R. Mroz5,6, R. Segarra7, E. Molins7, D. Jarreta7, E. Garcia-Gil7, 1Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; 2Clinical Research Institute, Medford, OR; 3Pulmonary Research Institute at Lungen Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, German Center for Lung Research, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 4Pulmonary Research Institute of Southeast Michigan, Farmington Hills, MI; 5Centrum Medycyny Oddechowej, Białystok, Poland; 6Medical University of Białystok, Białystok, Poland, 7AstraZeneca, Barcelona, Spain. (Presented by Debby Ham, Circassia Pharmaceuticals).

THE RNA BINDING PROTEIN HuR INCREASES GPX-1 mRNA DEGRADATION IN COPD.  A.J. Dabo, W. Ezegbunam, M. Salathe, N. Schmid, P. Geraghty, Robert Foronjy*, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY.

PDGFR-ß+ CELLS: A NOVEL RESERVOIRS FOR HIV IN THE LUNGS? *Sarah E. Stephenson1*, C.L Wilson1, L.M Felton1, L.M. Schnapp1, 1Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.

APPLICATION OF TELEMEDICINE AND INTEGRATED CARE TO THE MANAGEMENT OF SEVERE CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE. Patricia B. Koff1*, S.-J. Min2, D.J. Linderman1, T.J. Freitag1, N.F. Voelkel1, R.L. Keith1,3, T.J Stelzner4, D.P. Ritzwoller4, A.L. Beck4, R.W. Vandivier1, 1COPD Center, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine; 2Division of Health Care Policy and Research, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; 3Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO; 4Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Denver, CO.

E-CIGARETTE VAPING / AEROSOLS - A SAFE GO-TO ALTERNATIVE TO CIGARETTE SMOKING?  N. Durmus1, J.L. Blum2, J.R. Ratner2,  J.T. Zelikoff2, Gabriele Grunig1,2*,  1NYU School of Medicine, Department of Medicine (Pulmonary Medicine)  and 2Department Environmental Medicine, New York, NY.

LONG-TERM IMPACT OF REMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE EXPOSURE ON RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS AND QUALITY OF LIFEFernando Diaz del Valle1, J.K. Zakrajsek1, H.W. Bell1, V.R. Ramakrishnan2, D.N. Frank3, R.W. Vandivier1, 1COPD Program, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine and 2Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 3Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

DETECTION OF APOPTOSIS IN SMOKERS USING FUNCTIONAL MOLECULAR IMAGINGMonica P. Goldklang*, L. Fonseca, K. Stearns, R. Yeh, G. Wagener, L.L. Johnson, J.M. D’Armiento.     Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

THE PULMONARY FIBROSIS RISK ALLELE rs35705950 IS ASSOCIATED WITH ACCELERATED AIRWAY EPITHELIAL SENESCENCEJonathan S. Kurche1,2*, J. Huber1, E. Dobrinskikh1, H.-W. Chu3, C.M. Evans1, I. Yang4, D.A. Schwartz1, 1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO; 3Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO; 4Division of Bioinformatics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO.

REPETITIVE INTRA-TRACHEAL DELIVERY OF AAV-Cre TO E-CADHERIN FLOXED MICE CAUSE LUNG-RESTRICTED E-CADHERIN KNOCKDOWN AND LUNG FUNCTION ABNORMALITIES. Si Chen1,3*, K. Nishida1, J. Loube2, W.Mitzner2, V.K. Sidhaye1,2 , 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 2Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Program in Respiratory Biology and Lung Disease, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Changhai Hospital, the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.


POSTER VIEWING – Wine and Cheese Reception
Friday, June 8, 2018
5:00-7:00 PM


POSTERS

ANTI-RAGE ANTIBODY REDUCES ELASTASE-INDUCED EMPHYSEMA IN MICEJonathan E. Phillips*, D. Fong, X. Zhang, Amgen Inc., Inflammation, One Amgen Center Drive, Thousand Oaks, CA.

LARGE-SCALE PLASMA PROTEOME ANALYSIS OF COPD AND ASTHMA: SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE TWO DISEASES AND IDENTIFICATION OF NOVEL BIOLOGICAL CLUSTERS WITHIN EACH DISEASE. Masaru Suzuki1*, J.J. Cole2, S. Konno1, H. Makita1, H. Kimura1, M. Nishimura1, R.A. Maciewicz3, 1 Department of Respiratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2 GLAZgo Discovery Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK; 3Respiratory, Inflammation and Autoimmunity, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.

DECREASED EXACERBATIONS AND IMPROVEMENT IN ASTHMA SYMPTOM CONTROL IN ASTHMA COPD OVERLAP (ACO) TREATED WITH OMALIZUMAB: DATA FROM THE PROSPERO COHORT STUDY.  N.A. Hanania1, B.E. Chipps2, Noelle M. Griffin3*, B.L. Trzaskomat3, A. Iqbal3, T.B. Casale4, 1Asthma Clinical Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX;  2Capital Allergy and Respiratory Disease Center, Sacramento, CA;  3Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA; 4University of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

PROTEINASE 3 AS A MEDIATOR OF EMPHYSEMARobert A. Stockley*, P. Newby, Birmingham, UK.

EXACERBATION HISTORY AND EOSINOPHIL COUNT ARE PREDICTORS OF OUTCOMES FOLLOWING ICS WITHDRAWAL IN COPD.  H. Watz1, Kay Tetzlaff 2,3*, A. Mueller,2 H. Magnussen1, P.M.A. Calverley4, 1Pulmonary Research Institute at Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North, Grosshansdorf, Germany; 2Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbH, Ingelheim am Rhein, Germany; 3Department of Sports Medicine, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 4Clinical Science Centre, Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORAL HEALTH AND COPD EXACERBATIONSArianne Baldomero1*, A. Petersen2, J. Connett2, K. Kunisaki1,3, C. Wendt1,3, 1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; MN, 2Division of Biostatistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; 3Pulmonary Section, Department of Medicine, Minneapolis VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN.

ALPHA-1-ANTITRYPSIN BINDS TO GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR. Xiyuan Bai*, A. Bai, Z. Feng, J.R. Honda, A. Musheyev, R.Virdi, M. Tomasicchio, R.J. Harbeck, R.A. Sandhaus, E.D. Chan, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO.

B CELLS DRIVE iBALT FORMATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF CHRONIC LUNG ALLOGRAFT DYSFUNCTIONNatalia F. Smirnova1,2*, T.M. Conlon1, C. Morrone1, A.Ö. Yildirim1, O. Eickelberg2,  1Comprehensive Pneumology Center, University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich and Helmholtz Zentrum München, Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Munich, Germany; 2Division of Respiratory Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, CO.

A CRITICAL ROLE FOR ABC TRANSPORTERS IN PERSISTENT LUNG INFLAMMATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF EMPHYSEMA AFTER SMOKE EXPOSURE. Monica Goldklang*, J. Sonett, P. Sklepkiewicz, A. Gerber, J. Trischler, T. Zelonina, M. Westerterp, V. Lemaître, Y. Okada, J. D’Armiento, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

INHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SMOKE INDUCED MMP1 USING A NOVEL DRUG TO PREVENT ALVEOLAR TISSUE DAMAGE.  J. Sonett, T. Shiomi, V. Anguiano, D. Woode, M. Goldklang, U. Unachukwa, R. Xiao, T. Zelonina, T. Shiomi, Jeanine D’Armiento*, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.

LECTIN COMPLEMENT PATHWAY IN COPD AND ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN DEFICIENCY (AATD). A. Mikosz1, C. Strange2, S. Janciauskiene3, J. Stolk4, P. Braubach5, D. Jonigk5, R. Sandhaus1, I. Petrache1,6, Karina Serban1,6*, 1Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health;  2Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina; 3Department of Pulmonary and Infectious Diseases, Hannover University, Hannover, Germany; 4Department of Medicine, Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands; 5Institute for Pathology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany; 6Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado, Denver, CO..

EFFECTS OF ACLIDINIUM BROMIDE ON MAJOR ADVERSE CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS AND COPD EXACERBATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH COPD AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS.  R.A. Wise1, B.M. Scirica2,3, D.A. Schoenfeld3, S.Z. Daoud4, J. Román5, C. Reisner4, E.Garcia-Gil6, K.R. Chapman7, 1Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 2Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA; 3Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; 4AstraZeneca R&D Centre, Gaithersburg, MD; 5AstraZeneca R&D Centre, Gothenburg, Sweden; 6AstraZeneca R&D Centre, Barcelona, Spain; 7University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. (Presented by Dan Aja, Circassia Pharmaceuticals).

HOME INDOOR AIR-POLLUTION LINKED TO WORSENED AUTONOMIC FUNCTION IN FORMER SMOKERS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD)Sarath Raju*, E. Brigham, K. Kirsten, C. Gummerson, C. Lemoine Soto, A. Fawzy, A. Balasubramanian, L.M. Paulin, N. Putcha, N.N. Hansel, M.C. McCormack, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

GROWTH DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR 15 (GDF15)-MEDIATED LUNG AGING PROMOTES RESPIRATORY HUMAN RHINOVIRUS INFECTIONQun Wu*, W. Ren, S. Ye, M. Koenigshoff, O. Eickelberg, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.

INVESTIGATING THE ROLE OF FUT2 FUCOSYLATION AND E-CADHERIN STABILITY IN COPD PATHOGENESISKristine Nishida1*, A. Keller1, S. Chen1, R. Mathais1, N. Hansel1, V. Sidhayel2, 1Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD;  2Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.

PLASMA URIC ACID AS A NOVEL PREDICTOR OF OUTCOME IN COPD ASSOCIATED PULMONARY HYERTENSION. Mehdi A. Fini*, S. Pugliese, C. Meadows, R. Bowler, T. Bull, K. Stenmark, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.

RECOVERY FOLLOWING COPD EXACERBATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RESPIRATORY FAILUREJonathan K. Zakrajsek1*, H.W. Bell1, F. Diaz del Valle1, D.N. Frank2, M.R. Zamora1, J.S. Lee1, T.L. Phang3, A.A. Ginde4, T.H. Kiser5, M.E. Abrams1, S.S. Tallieu1, A.N. Gerber6, R.W. Vandivier1, 1COPD Program, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine; 2Division of Infectious Diseases; 3Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine; 4Department of Emergency Medicine; 5Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; 6Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO.

APPROACHES TO INCREASE INTRACELLULAR SPHINGOSINE‐1‐PHOSPHATE (S1P) TO IMPROVE LUNG INJURY OUTCOMES FOLLOWING CHRONIC CIGARETTE SMOKE EXPOSUREErica L. Beatman1*, K. Ni1, K. Koike1, A. Scruggs1, J. Jung1, I.A. Bronova1, E.V. Berdyshev1, K.S. Schweitzer1, I. Petrache1,2, 1National Jewish Health; 2University of Colorado, CO.

ENZYMATIC CONTROL OF SPHINGOSINE-1 PHOSPHATE (S1P) IN LUNG CELLS DURING CIGARETTE SMOKING (CS).  April Scruggs1*, E. Beatman1, K. Koike1, R.P. Bowler1, I.A. Bronova1, E.V. Berdyshev1, K.S. Schweitzer1, I. Petrache1,2, 1Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO; 2University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

DEMOGRAPHICS AND PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PI*MZ ALLELE SUBGROUP IDENTIFIED IN THE US NATIONAL DETECTION PROGRAM FOR ALPHA-1-ANTITRYPSIN DEFICIENCY.  M. Brantly1,2, C. Charleston2, R. Oshins1, S. Kavanagh3, Angela Davis4*, 1University of Florida; 2GeneAidyx; 3Kavanagh Statistical Consulting; 4Grifols, Research Triangle Park, NC.


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Program Learning Objectives

The overarching objectives of the 2018 Thomas L. Petty Aspen Lung Conference are to:

  1. To provide an international forum for leading basic, translational, and clinical researchers to exchange ideas regarding fundamental concepts underlying susceptibility and resistance to develop COPD.
  2. To stimulate interactions between the fields of phenotype/endotypes, genomics/epigenetics, aging, stem cell biology, metabolism  and lipid biochemistry with the goal of identifying emerging, shared interests that may lead to the performance of more efficient and productive research. 
  3. To advance our understanding of clinical and molecular COPD phenotypes/endotypes that predict risk or response in order to quickly translate preclinical findings to more effective, personalized therapies.
  4. To challenge and thereby stimulate the scientific interests of trainees, attracting a new generation of junior investigators into the field of COPD pathobiology.

At the conclusion of this conference attendees will be able to:

  1. Discuss the concept of COPD heterogeneity, and the possibility that unique phenotypes or endotypes may identify cohorts with common mechanisms of disease and response to treatment.
  2. Appreciate the complex interactions between genomics/epigenetics, aging, immune/epithelial interactions, metabolism and lipid biochemistry, and their link to COPD susceptibility and resilience.
  3. Incorporate current concepts from stem cell biology to better understand repair of the injured lung. 
  4. Understand mechanisms by which pulmonary vascular disease and lung cancer develop in COPD.​