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Student Creative Work

Reflections


Students reflect on illness; including three selections from the Ethics in the Health Professions course, to Dan Craig's final project for AIDS and American Culture elective:



Heartbeat:  A Poem in Three Parts by Lindsay Heuser

 


Endless Questions, Painful Answers and Boundless Love by Rachna Unnithan

 


The Calls Keep Coming by Matthew Garcia


Senior medical student David Murphy recently published, "Listening to 
the Voices from the Bateyes,"
a Spanish-language book about HIV in the
Dominican Republic.  “The stories are amazing, powerful, unique and provide
another perspective about living with HIV,” says Therese Jones, PhD, Associate
Director of the Center for Bioethics and Humanities. The Center’s Arts and
Humanities in Healthcare Program is providing a scholarship to Murphy to help
fund his publication.  Learn more>>​

 

"Angel, What a War" by Daniel Craig, is a song about suffering together, about compassion.  He says, "These themes resonated with me in our AIDS and American Culture class especially in contrast to and in the midst of the waves of martyrdom and political anger that color the HIV movement if not each individual patient. I had an image of a person alone waiting to die, looking for a sliver of hope and exhausted from a battle - physically obviously, but also perhaps culturally, politically, and most of all personally. Then the voice of the song is one trying to figure out how to love without solutions, how to love with just the power of companionship in waiting and looking, in failing and forgiving. I thought it was important to include the idea that compassion does not require innocence, and that the need for forgiveness almost always exists on both sides somehow.  Finally, 'Angel, what a war' was a phrase that for me captured the idea of being amazed an impressed by this battle without knowing what to say about it. I think it has an air of detachment and wonder rather than some impassioned battle cry or self-righteous plea, and that feeling lingered longest with me after our two weeks of reading and discussion." download lyrics