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Anschutz Medical Campus

University of Colorado Denver
 

Research

The CU Anschutz Medical Campus is a nationally recognized leader in the creation of new knowledge and innovative approaches to improving human health. With sponsored research awards totaling more than $400 million annually, CU Anschutz researchers collaborate with partner and affiliate hospitals, clinics and centers to bring research from the bench to the patient’s bedside.

The CU Anschutz tradition of innovation has created several groundbreaking achievements, including the first liver transplant in the world, the first vaccine for shingles, and the first to use human cell cloning to study genetics and cancer.

Discoveries on the Anschutz Medical Campus have led to new medical devices, pharmaceuticals, diagnostic methods, treatment of debilitating conditions and improved quality of life for patients and consumers worldwide. Since 2002, CU Anschutz technology has led to the filing of 1,300 patent applications and the formation of 53 new companies, funded by more than $914 million in venture capital and public and private equity investment and grants. ​​​​

Research Resources

Search our researcher database and learn about our areas of research expertise. Get information about our labs, facilities and clinical trials. Read about our new Good Manufacturing Practice facility for cell bio-manufacturing.

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Dr. Schwartz's team awarded major NIH grant

Dr. David Schwartz
A team of researchers led by David Schwartz, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine, has been awarded a $7.9 million grant from the National Heart, Blood and Lung Institute (NHLBI) to search for better treatments for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
The researchers at the University of Colorado will partner with Parion Sciences, a Durham, N.C.-based biotech company to create molecules called “mucolytic agents” that are designed to help patients with lung diseases clear mucus from their lungs. These agents could become drugs aimed at dramatically improving the lives of millions of people who suffer from some lung diseases, such as IPF.
“The studies we propose have the potential to improve early diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis, and thus could have a highly significant overall impact on what is now essentially an incurable disease,” said Schwartz.

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