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ISSUE 16 Feb. 2016 

QUICKLINKS
Faculty Matters is a bimonthly publication for the University of Colorado School of Medicine faculty. 

   

Register at: 
http://som.ucdenver.edu/FacultyDevelopment/

Remediation of the Struggling Learner

February 29, 2016
3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.   
Jeannette Guerrasio, MD
Nighthorse Campbell, Room 103

Mentoring and Advising              
March 15, 2016
3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.   
Tai Lockspeiser, MD
Nighthorse Campbell, Room 103

Teach, Learn, Guide-Using Learning Theory to Give a Killer Talk
March 15, 2016
1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Dennis Boyle, MD
Nighthorse Campbell, Room 103

New Faculty Career Development Workshop
March 31, 2016
7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.    
Steven Lowenstein, MD, MPH
Nighthorse Campbell Building Auditorium

Challenging Conversations and Contexts - Round 1
April 4, 2016
Noon to 3:00 p.m.
Kirsten Broadfoot, PhD
Ed 1, Room 4103

Challenging Conversations and Contexts - Round 2
April 4, 2016
2:45 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Kirsten Broadfoot, PhD
Ed 1, Room 4103

Challenging Conversations and Contexts - Round 1
April 7, 2016
Noon to 3:00 p.m.
Kirsten Broadfoot, PhD
Ed 1, Room 4103

Challenging Conversations and Contexts - Round 2
April 7, 2016
2:45 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Kirsten Broadfoot, PhD
Ed 1, Room 4103


Active Learning in the Classroom: Fad or Fixture?April 11, 2016
1:00 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Presentation by:
Noah Finkelstein, PhD
1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Facilitated discussion by:
Drs. Kari Franson, Andy Bradford and Noah Finkelstein
Shore Auditorium, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building
RSVP not required

 

Two Quick Ways to Start Lectures or Small Groups for Memory 
Retention
 

By Janet Corral, PhD

Often students come to a learning session right off the heels of a previous one. It’s important to use the early minutes of a learning session to help learners both transition into and engage in the session ahead. Doing so not only refocuses their attention, but helps you create an environment to support learners’ retention of key content, while assimilating it correctly into their conceptualization of the topic ahead.

Here are two quick ways that you can help learners transition and recall prior learning experiences right at the start of a learning session, setting them up for success within the session:

Read more.


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PERSPECTIVES

Art @ Work: Implicit and Explicit Advocacy in Biomedical and Healthcare Settings

By Tess Jones, PhD

Let me begin with a general observation:  we know that when people come together to make meaning of a work of art in a gallery or a theatre, they have an opportunity not only to cultivate connections to one another but also to gain insights about themselves. And when people in biomedicine and healthcare come together to make meaning of a work of art, they also have an opportunity:

  • ​To hone observational and interpretive skills;
  • To acknowledge the certainty of uncertainty;
  • To appreciate the value of multiple viewpoints; and
  • To integrate personal reactions into professional identities. 

I call this kind of art work as “implicit” or “indirect” advocacy. Immersion in, and interaction with, the arts can enhance professional well-being and improve patient care by developing a tolerance for ambiguity, deepening empathy, nurturing imagination, and fostering self-reflection and self-awareness.

In contrast, let me describe what I am calling “explicit” or “direct” advocacy. For patients, families, caregivers and activists, art can work as an explicit critique of the limits of biomedicine in understanding and expressing the complexities of the human experience of disease and illness, impairment and disability. In addition, it can work as a direct challenge to the limitations of healthcare by: exposing cultural, gender, racial and socio-economic stereotypes; by dismantling accepted understandings of what is and what is not normal; by confronting the stigma of certain conditions; and by mitigating isolation and powerlessness through the creation of community.

Now let me give you three examples in recent history. ​Read more.

 

Reminder: Applications for the Doris Duke Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists Due February 26th, 2016 

The University of Colorado School of Medicine Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists (CU-FRCS) is one of 10 national programs funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. It provides a seed grant and mentoring program for junior faculty physicians—women and men—who face hardship from demands at home that place their careers at risk. Up to five scholars will be funded annually for one year awards of $43,333.

Program co-director Judy Regensteiner, PhD, underscores the university’s goal of retaining physician scientists. “The Doris Duke Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists addresses the critical issue of young physician researchers leaving academic research because of the difficulties of being a researcher in the face of windows of vulnerability and personal hardship,” she said. “If we can retain some of these scientists, important research areas may be addressed that might otherwise have not been addressed and people will benefit.”

Click here for eligibility criteria and application information. Submit your application by Friday, February 26 to Program Assistant Rachel Aerne at Rachel.Aerne@ucdenver.edu. For more information, contact program directors Judy Regensteiner, PhD (PI/PD) or Anne Libby, PhD (Co-PI/PD).

Enroll in the Colorado Mentoring Training Program (CO-Mentor): 

What strengths do you bring to the team? What strengths do others see in you?
By Anne ​Libby and Greg Austin

Most of us think that everyone sees things the same way we do. We usually think that what we say and do is clear and understandable, and that we, in turn, understand other people’s behaviors and intentions. We also think that people see us the way we see ourselves. You may have talents that can be consistently applied in order to achieve success—the definition of a personal strength—and you expect others see that you possess these strengths. But is that true? Do people recognize the same strengths in you for which you would like to be known? Is it possible that others recognize strengths in you that you are not even fully aware of, especially if it is an undeveloped strength that needs practice to grow? We can assess observed strengths and analyze the information for professional and personal development in workshop activities in the Colorado Mentoring Training Program (CO-Mentor).

In CO-Mentor, we enroll pairs of faculty mentors and mentees in dyads to work together on skill building in self-knowledge and communication using important academic products as the means to learn new skills. In the context of practicing mentoring skills, we review CVs, write personal statements for biosketches and assess values for effective goal setting and negotiation. We also master networking and giving and receiving feedback, writing effective letters of support and building a complete mentorship team. We work together to improve work-life balance and learn about money and personal career planning. Now in its 6th year, the CO-Mentor program is free to 25 faculty mentors and their mentees annually and fills every year. Enrollment is conducted online each May.

Read more.


LINKS TO ARTICLES ABOUT 

ACADEMIC MEDICINE

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