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Department of Psychiatry

Department of Psychology
 

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship

Curriculum


Our curriculum covers two years in which the first year clinical and didactic experiences addresses essential skills and the second year allows the resident to use the block of elective time to gain intensive experiences in specific clinical, administrative and/or research areas.

The educational cycle i​s divided into a summer session from July to September and a September to June session. Classes and Seminars are taught by a diverse faculty group. Classes are held at the University of Colorado and Children's Hospital Colorado (CHCO) campuses. Participants from the UCH and CHCO psychology intern programs and the Harris Fellowship (Infant Mental Health) program add to the educational clinical experience. ​Classes in the summer are held in 3-4 hour blocks, to allow in depth coverge of topics. The rest of the year, multiple courses run logitunidally for an hour per week.

Summer Courses
Psychiatry Emergencies
This 4 hour course reviews urgent clinical matters that residents might encounter in their work with children and adolescents, especially in the Emergency Department, consultation liaison service and inpatient services. 
Psychological Testing
This 3 hour course covers testing statistics, common referral questions, non-proprietary screening tests, and tests for assessing presence of pathology, domains of function and capacities.
Ethics
This is required for first and second year child and adolescent psychiatry residents. Residents explore various aspects of biomedical ethics in four case conferences during July and August. Second year Residents are required to submit a formal case presentation reflective of an ethical dilemma or issue and using evidence based medicine techniques, find an article or articles for the group to review that elucidates current ethical knowledge applicable to the case.
How to Teach
This 3 hour seminar helps the first year child resident conceptualize their role as teacher of medical students and general child psychiatry residents.  They review how to give a brief presentation and how to observe and give feedback to learners at differing levels of training and competency.   
Development of the School Age Child
In the first year, residents typically work with school age children and adolescents.  This development primer of school age children is offered during the summer to enhance the knowledge and comfort of child residents in their work with school age children. 
Introduction to Psychopharmacology
This 3 hour course covers developmental psychopharmacology and discusses major categories of medications used to treat emotional and behavioral difficulties in youth.  
Legal Issues
This 4 hour course covers legal issues that can arise in working with children and their families.  This includes issues that are particular to Colorado as well as issues covered by federal laws.
Fall-Spring Courses
Child Psychiatry Grand Rounds (CPGR)
This is required for first and second year child and adolescent psychiatry Residents. CPGR is convened Tuesdays during the months of September thru June. This is a CME Category I accredited grand rounds sponsored by the CHCO CME and CHCO Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Presentations are clinically or research focused and multidisciplinary, from both within and outside the Division. In addition to faculty presentations, for Grand Rounds, each child and adolescent psychiatry resident presents grand rounds with a psychology trainee and the help of a faculty mentor. 
Systems-Based Practice
This first year course covers the various systems that can be involved with children, including school systems, the foster care system, the affordable care act and funding of mental health and medical care, community mental health systems in Colorado and the juvenile justice system. 
Pediatric Behavioral Medicine
This multidisciplinary course covers issues typically encountered on the CL service or in pediatric primary care.  Examples include understanding current theories of pain and pain management, encopresis and enuresis, delirium, development and adherence to medical regimens and specific chronic illnesses. 
Overview of Psychopathology
This major course covers the development and presentation of psychopathology as it occurs in youth and as described by DSMV.  Each diagnostic category is discussed in depth by various experts in the department.  Discussion includes evidence for treatments, both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic.  
Group
The first year residents participate in anxiety clinic and disruptive behavior disorder clinic for 6 months respectively.  Each clinic has an associated evidence based group therapy (cognitive Behavioral therapy for anxiety and Dr. Cook’s evidence based therapy for disruptive behaviors).  This class reviews each therapy during the 6 months that the resident participates in each of the clinics and helps the residents prepare for their upcoming group.
Development
This course examines development from infancy through young adulthood.  The goal of the class is to understand normative development and why youth might have disturbances in development.
Quality Improvement
This multidisciplinary group discussion occurs every quarter.  Each service is responsible for identifying and presenting a case in which systems could have worked better.  This discussion is open to the entire division, and at times may also involve members from other systems of care.  The goal of the discussion is to identify systems issues as well as an actionable plan. 
Journal Club
The CR1s and CR2s both participate in monthly journal club.  Multiple methods are used to engage residents in understanding different types of articles.  CR1s are paired with CR2s. 
Substance Abuse
This course is taught be experts in the field of substance abuse in youth.  In addition to covering the epidemiology and presentation of substance abuse, the residents are taught evidence based methods to assess, engage and treat youth with substance abuse problems. 
Neuropsychiatry
This course is offered every other year for first and second year child and adolescent psychiatry residents and psychology trainees.  In addition to gaining an understanding of functional neuroanatomy, this course reviews current imaging techniques and important findings relevant to our understanding of the brain and clinical work with children and families.
Summer Courses
Psychological Testing
This 3 hour course is offered every other year and covers testing statistics, common referral questions, non-proprietary screening tests, and tests for assessing presence of pathology, domains of function and capacities.
Development 0-6
In the second year, child and adolescent psychiatry residents begin to care for young children in their infant clinic.  This development primer is offered during the summer to enhance the knowledge and comfort of child residents in their work with children 0-6 years of age.  
Autism
Residents work with children who have been diagnosed with autism in various settings.  In addition to the education for trainees that is offered on our Neuropsychiatric Care Unit, and in our multidisciplinary diagnostic clinic, this course consolidates behavioral approaches to working with these youth and their families.   
Sexual Development
This course covers normal sexual development as well as deviations that may lead youth to clinical services and/or adjudication. 
How to Teach
The second year course is a continuation of the first year “how to teach.”  This course focuses on how to give a presentation to colleagues and multidisciplinary clinicians and faculty. 
Psychiatry Emergencies
This 4 hour course reviews urgent clinical matters that residents might encounter in their work with children and adolescents, especially in the Emergency Department, consultation liaison service and inpatient services. 
 
Fall-Spring Courses
Infant
This is required for second year child and adolescent psychiatry Residents. The seminar convenes January thru June. The seminar includes presentation of readings, didactics, and group supervision of clinical work involving children from birth to age five years, parents and youth with pregnancy related problems. Second year Residents are required to present an infant case presentation using DC0-3R. The seminar material is applied by Residents in (a video review and direct observation faculty) supervised weekly infant/ toddler/preschool age clinic.
Family
This is required for second year child and adolescent psychiatry Residents. The seminar is convened September thru June. CHCO & UCDSOM psychology interns attend. This weekly seminar emphasizes structural and strategic models of family therapy, utilizing a format that mixes didactics with live ongoing family therapy conducted in “real time” featuring live “behind the mirror” supervision.
Diversity
During this 8 week seminar, residents and psychology trainees review our current understanding of the many individual, family, community and systems of care factors that impact presentation of symptoms, access to care and treatment outcomes.  This seminar utilizes case based learning methods. 
Transition to Practice
This seminar is designed to expose residents to different career pathways and help residents transition to the next phase of their careers.  Invited speakers discuss their own career paths as well as practical topics such as writing a CV, interviewing for a job, giving a job talk, negotiating a contract, setting up a practice, purchasing insurance etc. 
Important Readings in Child Psychiatry
There are key studies that inform our practice, key writings that help us understand topics relevant to our work.  This seminar reviews these papers, chapters etc. and topics are chosen in part by the class.
Child Psychiatry and the Law
This seminar provides background regarding the development of our current legal system as it applies to children.


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