Skip to main content
Sign In
 

Research Study: Yoga-Based Treatment for Veterans

with mTBI and Post-Concussive Headaches


Traumatic Brain Injury

It is well known that military personnel are returning from recent conflicts with notable rates of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and associated persistent post-concussive symptoms (PCS), including headaches and emotional distress. Such symptoms can negatively impact the performance of those on Active Duty, throughout deployment, in and post-combat, as well as following discharge (Veterans). Because of these far-reaching effects, mTBI and associated comorbidities pose a significant challenge and burden to Service Members/Veterans, their families, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), and local, regional and national resources including, health care, educational, and vocational systems.

Optimally, an intervention for those with chronic post-concussive headaches (PCH) would show efficacy at reversing post-mTBI adversity, and be able to be utilized with minimal stigma. In addition, the intervention should be highly accessible, low cost, be able to be self-sustaining (e.g., portable) and with minimal side effects.

Yoga is a possible benefit to those with a MTBIOne potential intervention is yoga, a practice involving physical postures, breath awareness and exercises, and mindfulness meditation.

As such, the goal of this study is to learn more about a yoga-based treatment for Veterans with mTBI and Post-Concussive Headaches.

 

 

 

 


This project is being funded by the Colorado Traumatic Brain Injury Trust Fund (part of Mindsource Brain Injury Network), Contract IHEA #101374

Mindsource Brain Injury Network 

Lisa Brenner PhD
Principal Investigator
 
 
 
 
Lisa M. Betthauser MBA, PhD
Co-Investigator; Junior Yoga Instructor; Fidelity, Adherence, and Project Management
 
 
 
 
Nazanin H. Bahraini PhD
Co-Investigator, Implementation and Dissemination
 
 
 
 
Ann Bortz PsyD, E-RYT
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator, Lead Yoga Instructor
 
 
 
 
Jeri E. Forster PhD
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator, Data Analysis
 
 
 
 
Hal S. Wortzel MD
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator, Medical Clearance
 
 
 
 
Meredith Mealer PhD
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator, Medical Clearance
 
 
 
 
Theresa D. Hernández PhD
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator
 
 
 
 
Lindsey L. Monteith PhD
Co-Investigator, Co-Investigator
 
 
 
 
Joe Huggins MSW MSCIS
Co-Investigator, Mobile App Development
 
 
 
 
Carlee Kreisel
Study Coordinator
 
 
 
 

Yoga is a practice involving physical postures, breath awareness and exercises, and mindfulness meditation. Yoga is increasingly being used as a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) intervention for those experiencing physical and psychological distress. 

yoga postures

See full yoga infographic

Yoga Weekly Video Sessions

Reminder: Clicking on the link below will take you to a private website where you will login in order to watch the videos

Week 1: Interconnection of mind, body and breath

Week 2: How do you live in your body?

Week 3: The changing nature of feelings and sensations

Week 4: Present moment awareness

Week 5: Reactivity vs. responsivity

Week 6: Noticing and stepping out of stories

Week 7: Welcoming in all aspects of experience

Week 8: Maintaining balance through attunement

Website Disclaimer for Yoga Videos

This study plans to learn more about a yoga-based treatment for Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and headaches, and to obtain information regarding the effect of this treatment on Veterans’ symptoms. Yoga is a system of exercises that is thought to help with physical and mental health well-being. As a part of this study you are provided with resources to help you practice yoga at home.

Sometimes individuals may initially experience emotional distress as they become more attuned to their bodies through the practice of yoga. Physical injury is a potential, though uncommon risk, during the practice of yoga. Generally, yoga postures are safe and the treatment will focus on slow movements and proper alignment. We encourage participants to do the movement in a safe manner.

National Institute of Health:
National Center for Complementary and Integrated Health: Yoga in Depth
https://nccih.nih.gov/health/yoga/introduction.htm
National Institute of Health:
National Center for Complementary and Integrated Health: 5 Thinks You Should Know About Yoga
https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/yoga
National Institute of Health:
National Center for Complementary and Integrated Health: Yoga as a Complementary Health Approach Infographic
https://nccih.nih.gov/news/multimedia/infographics/yoga
National Institute of Health:
National Center for Complementary and Integrated Health: Spotlighted Research Results - Yoga
https://nccih.nih.gov/health/279/research