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Department of Medicine Newsroom

The Latest Research, Community and Medical News Updates


 

​Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care

Team Science 2016

Three interdisciplinary research groups will receive funding through the DOM Team Science Program.

Oliver Eickelberg, MD

This November Oliver Eickelberg, MD will become the new division head of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Eric Schmidt, MD

As the son of a father with a serious chronic illness, Eric Schmidt came to understand the power of a good bedside manner at an early age.

Todd Bull, MD

It was in the Intensive Care Unit there that he developed a keen interest in the delicate relationship between heart and lungs.

Marvin Schwarz, MD

“Our overarching goal is to continue to make Colorado the place where the next generation is being trained”

 

DOM Newsroom

‘You Saved My Life’: Cancer Survivor To Peyton Manning

“So our patient here came in with a massive tumor encompassing his whole right lung,” explained Victor Villalobos, Medical Oncologist and Director of Sarcoma at the University of Colorado Hospital.

Stripping health care from 20 million people is unconscionable

Guest commentary by Mark Earnest, Steve Federico and David Keller, faculty members at the CU School of Medicine: “Twenty million people who stand to lose their health care if the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is repealed.

Cold caps reduce chemotherapy hair loss, studies show

Virginia Borges, director of breast cancer research at University of Colorado Hospital: “They have more energy, they really feel like a return to themselves, their sense of themselves, much faster because they don’t have to wait for their hair to regrow.”

Everything You Need to Know About Biosimilar Drugs for Ulcerative Colitis

Mark Gerich, an IBD specialist and clinical director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center of the University of Colorado Hospital, says that the track record of cost savings for biosimilars in the countries where they’ve been adopted is mixed.

The doctor is in: 13 clinicians to follow on Twitter

The adviser: @medicalaxioms Mark Reid is a Denver-based doctor with a large following who trades in pith and wisdom.

Study: Immigrants here illegally must suffer to receive care for kidney disease

The 20 study participants have lived in the U.S. an average of 15 years, said Lilia Cervantes, a hospitalist at Denver Health, an associate professor at the CU School of Medicine and author of the study.

What you need know about the CDC's updated vaccine guidelines

Unlike traditional flu shots made from dead virus, the nasal flu vaccine is made from a weakened form of influenza virus. Studies have found it largely ineffective.

Colorado woman receives world's tiniest pacemaker

Imagine your heart stopping for five, ten, even thirty seconds and not knowing it. For one Colorado woman, a rare heart condition would cause her to pass out and her heart would stop beating.

Healthy hearts tied to income

A startling trend in health care has emerged in recent years. Americans’ life expectancy is tied to their income.

The Skinny on Coconut Oil: It May Be Fattening

“There’s very little data showing health benefits,” said Andrew Freeman, director of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at National Jewish Health. “It’s not in one’s best interest.”

Study: To keep pounds off, consider walking the dog

CU Anschutz researchers examine how patterns of light exercise, sedentary behavior affect weight-loss maintenance.

6 Tips for Integrating Exercise Into Your Workday

So many of us worker bees spend our weekdays glued to our desk chairs, wondering, perhaps, if tapping at our keyboards counts as exercise. (Sadly, it doesn’t.)

A device to cap chemo hair loss

University of Colorado Hospital is the first in the state to offer the DigniCap, an FDA-approved scalp-cooling device designed to slow hair loss from chemotherapy.

Study questions safety of e-cigarettes

Results of an animal study at CU suggest that the nicotine devices may be just as toxic to skin and lungs as tobacco cigarettes.

High-Value Care Increasingly Becoming Core Part of Med School Curriculum

“We noticed that patients often received well-intended medical care that was probably unnecessary, but there wasn’t a place in our training curriculum to help identify and limit such occurrences,” says Brandon Combs.