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Lam Lab


Research

 

Our laboratory develops mass spectrometry and computational techniques to understand the mechanisms driving disease progression in humans. Our current research focuses include protein dynamics, protein alternative isoform, and protein annotation methods. 


ER STRESS IN CARDIAC REMODELING

The integrity of cellular proteins must be constantly regulated to maintain cellular functions. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when protein homeostasis is disrupted, and induces potent response pathways to restore protein folding and homeostasis. Evidence now implicates ER stress as a central feature in diseases including cardiac hypertrophy and failure, but details of how ER stress quantitatively impacts on protein expression, dynamics, and signaling are poorly understood. Our laboratory employs multidimensional proteomics techniques to define the global proteostatic landscape of the cardiac proteome and how they are dysregulated during ER stress in diseases.

DIFFERENTIAL ALTERNATIV​E ISOFORM IN THE CARDIAC PROTEOME
Alternative splicing allows eukaryotes to produce a diverse proteome from a genome of limited size, by enabling multiple protein isoforms to be encoded in a single gene. Differential expression of alternative isoforms is common in human diseases from cancer to heart failure. Current knowledge remains poor on the functional consequences of alternative protein isoforms. Our goal is to develop new multi-omics strategies by integrating RNA-seq and shotgun proteomics approaches to determine the differential expression in the cardiac proteome.
FUNCTIONAL ANNOTATION OF GENES AND PROTEINS

Advances in large-scale “omics” approaches have led to an explosion of “gene list” data – lists of genes/proteins implicated in biological models resulting from discovery experiments. Connecting implicated molecules to useful knowledge is currently a major bottleneck in data interpretation. To help translate molecular data from “omics” studies into biological knowledge, we are exploring annotation strategies to make sense of discovered genes and connect to known disease processes.


Lab Members

Maggie Pui Yu Lam, PhD
​Assistant Professor
Division of Cardiology
Department of Medicine
Email: Maggie.Lam@ucdenver.edu
Phone: 303-724-3520 

 

​Cody Thomas, Bsc
Professional Research Assistant
Division of Cardiology
Department of Medicine
Email: Cody.T.Thomas@ucdenver.edu
Phone: 303-724-3786​​


Erin Yu Han, PhD 

Postdoctoral Fellow

Division of Cardiology

Department of Medicine

Email: Yu.Han@ucdenver.edu

Phone: 303-724-3786

 

Silas Wood, Bsc 

PhD Student (Biochemistry and Structural Biology)

Division of Cardiology

Department of Medicine

Email: Silas.Wood@ucdenver.edu

Phone: 303-724-3786​​​​


We have open positions for undergraduate helper, rotation PhD students, PhD students, and postdoctoral scholars. For details please visit us at our lab website: http://maggielab.org ​