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Department of Family Medicine

Predoctoral Pscychology Internship Additional Training Experiences


Optional seminars meet as follows. Some seminars include psychiatry residents and psychology interns and may have space limitations. Seminars for Key Concepts, Leadership Dialogs, Screening and Intervention are required for JFK trainees.

Family Therapy Seminar: - taught by Judy Reaven, Ph.D. and Isabelle Guillemet, M.D.

Held on Tuesdays from 4:00-5:30

The Family Therapy Seminar has been a course offered to both child psychiatry residents and clinical psychology interns for the past 15 years.  The interdisciplinary nature of this Seminar continues to be a relatively unique course offering within UC-School of Medicine, and has yielded positive feedback over the years from both disciplines.  The participants in the course arrive with a variety of experiences—everything from minimal experience in working with family, extensive family therapy experiences, including both didactic as well as clinic. 

The primary purpose of the Seminar is to offer a supervised and interactive clinical experience.  At this point in their training, both child residents as well as clinical psychology interns are quite close to autonomous clinical practice.  Although supplementary readings are available and provided to the students, the focus of the Seminar is for the participants to have the opportunity to work directly and/or observe their colleagues working directly with families.  All clinical work takes place in front of a one-way mirror.  The supervisors and other participants in the Seminar are behind the mirror, while two co-therapists and the family are in front of the mirror.  Messages from the team are “texted” into the therapists.  While there is not a single theoretical orientation within family therapy that is taught in the Seminar, participants are provided a basis for conceptualization within a Structural Family Therapy framework (Minuchin).  Other models for family treatment are introduced, including the work of Virginia Satir, the Italian school of family treatment and other post-modern approaches, including narrative therapy.  Efforts are made to tie together various models of intervention with each family’s presenting problems.  When “live” families are not available, we are able to show videos from previous classes, and if time allows, select articles that may complement the video and foster discussion.     

Child Development (Drs. Susan Hepburn and Deb Carter)

Key Concepts in Developmental Disabilities
Tuesdays, 8:15-10:15am (Fall & Spring)

Leadership Dialogues, JFK Partners – (Dr. Kathy Kennedy) 


Screening & Assessment of Children & Youth with ASD/ND -
(Drs. Hepburn/Katz)

Tuesdays, 1:00-3:30pm (Fall)

Intervention for Children & Youth with ASD/ND (Dr. LaVesser)

Tuesdays, 1:00-3:30pm (Spring)


Psychiatry Grand Rounds Wednesdays, 12:10 to 1:00 Shore Auditorium

Child Psychiatry Grand Rounds, Tuesdays, 12:00 to 1:00, The Children’s Hospital Denver Seminar Room

Neurology Grand Rounds, Wednesdays, 5:00 to 6:00, University Hospital Anschutz

Family Medicine Grand Rounds, 12:00 to 1:00

Geriatrics Grand Rounds, 1st 3rd & 5th Thursdays, 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. - East Auditorium RC-1

Hospital Wide Ethics Rounds – 2nd Monday, 8:00-9:00, Cancer Center

The Foundations of Doctoring Curriculum (FDC) is a 3 year, longitudinal curriculum that is required for all medical students who attend the University of Colorado School of Medicine. It provides the basic training in physical exam, communication skills, clinical reasoning and the development of a professional identity that essential to becoming a physician. The Psychology interns and post-doctoral fellows who engage in training at University of Colorado School of Medicine can elect to become “communication skills coaches” in the FDC for first and second year medical students. The total time commitment for the basic elective is 20 hours and includes didactic, experiential and ‘observed teaching’ learning experiences. Participation in this elective involves being trained in the Calgary Cambridge approach to medical communication and learning to work as a coach with medical students while they ‘interview’ standardized patients. Students who engage in this elective experience will:

  1. Increase their knowledge of components of medical education
  2. Develop knowledge about specific communication skills used by medical professionals
  3. Develop skills for teaching in small groups
  4. Develop and practice skills for coaching medical students using standardized patients

Levitt Distinguished Lecture Series

Developmental Psychobiology Research Group
2nd and 4th Tuesdays, 10:00 to 11:45 The Children’s Hospital Denver Seminar Room

Perinatal Vulnerability Research Group, 4th Tuesday, 8:15 to 10:00, The
Children’s Hospital Mountain View Room (Dr. Randy Ross)

Perinatal Research Group, 2nd & 4th Tuesday, 9:00 to 10:00, The
Children’s Hospital Castle Rock Video Room

Prevention Studies Research Group, 2nd & 4th Tuesday, 1:00 to 3:00, The
Children’s Hospital Denver Seminar Room

Developmental Disabilities Research Group, 2nd Tuesday, 8:15 to 10:00, The
Children’s Hospital, Mountain View Room

Neurobehavior Conference 1st Wednesday of the month 1:00 to 2:00 AO1 Rm 6101

DPRG Biannual Retreat in Estes Park, Colorado mid May (to be announced)

Psychiatry Junior Faculty/Trainee Poster Presentations mid May (to be announced)