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Department of Pharmacology

Department of Pharmacology
 

Graduate Training Curriculum

First Year Schedule


​Fall - Begin First Research Rotation

Frontiers in Pharmacology, PHCL 7600, 1.0 cr
Dr. T. Kutateladze, 303 724 3593.
This course introduces beginning graduate students to cutting-edge research topics in Pharmacology. The lectures are designed to be accessible to beginning doctoral students, and student discussion is strongly encouraged. Topics change yearly.

syllabus

Ethics in Research, PHCL 7605, 1.0 cr
Dr. Paula Hoffman, 303 724 3628
This course is designed to introduce students to issues around ethics of research, publication, and reviewing of manuscripts and grants. Lectures and discussions of the history of scientific fraud, examples from recent cases, examples of ethical dilemmas, and consequences of fraud will be covered.

syllabus

Biomedical Sciences Core Course I, IDPT 781, 2.0 cr.
Dr. M. Churchill - (Fall)
Unified presentation of fundamental principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Designed for all first-year basic sciences graduate students. Block 1: Building blocks and guiding biophysical principles.

syllabus

Biomedical Sciences Core Course II, IDPT 7812, 2.5 cr.
Dr. R. Davis - (Fall)
Unified presentation of fundamental principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Designed for all first-year basic sciences graduate students. Block 2: Generating the blocks.

syllabus

Biomedical Sciences Core Course III, IDPT 7813, 2.5 cr.
Dr. R. Evans - (Fall)
Unified presentation of fundamental principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Designed for all first-year basic sciences graduate students. Block 3: Building a cell: Cell structure and function.

syllabus

Biomedical Sciences Core Course IV, IDPT 7814, 1.5 cr.
Dr. A. Bradford - (Fall)
Unified presentation of fundamental principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Designed for all first-year basic sciences graduate students. Block 4: How does it function: Cell signaling.

syllabus

Biomedical Sciences Core Course V, IDPT 7815, 1.5 cr.
Dr. K. Artinger - (Fall)
Unified presentation of fundamental principles of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and molecular biology. Designed for all first-year basic sciences graduate students. Block 5: Putting it all together: Development, organs and systems.

syllabus

Introduction to Research in Pharmacology, PHCL 7650.1, 2.0 cr
Directed laboratory research in selected area by the faculty. Students are required take three rotations lasting one academic quarter each, starting in the fall quarter of their first year.

Introduction to Research in Pharmacology, PHCL 7650.2, 2.0 cr
Directed laboratory research in selected area by the faculty. Students’ third research rotation.

Winter - Begin Second Research Rotation.


Total Fall Semester Hours, 16.0 cr

Spring – Begin Third Research Rotation

Receptors and Cell Signaling, PHCL 7606, 3.0 cr
Dr. M. Dell’Acqua, 303 724 3616, Prereq. IDPT 7801, 7802, 7803
This course presents an in-depth treatment of the role of receptors and signal transduction systems in the regulation of overall cell function and growth. The course consists of both didactic lectures by faculty members and extensive student-led discussions and evaluations of current literature. Topics include: signaling coupled to seven-transmembrane receptors; heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins; phosphatidylinositol and other phospholipid-derived second messenger signaling; signaling via ligand-initiated calcium fluxes; serine-threonine proteins kinases; tyrosine protein kinases and growth factor receptor signaling; transforming growth factor, activin and NF Kappa b; intracellular targeting; steroid receptor structure and function; signaling pathways to apoptosis.

syllabus

Principles of  Pharmacology, PHCL 7620, 6.0 cr
Dr. W. Sather, 303 724 3130
This course will focus on an in-depth analysis of the basic principles of pharmacology (structure/activity of drugs, dose/response principles and specificity of action) and will analyze the mechanisms by which drugs produce their therapeutic effects. Medications to be covered include autonomic and central nervous systems drugs, cardiovascular drugs, anti-cancer drugs, antibiotics and antivirals, anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive drugs, and drugs of abuse (addictive drugs).

syllabus

Introduction to Research in Pharmacology, PHCL 7650, 2.0 cr
Directed laboratory research in selected area by the faculty. Students’ third research rotation.


Total Spring Semester Hours, 11.0 cr

Total Year-One Semester Hours, 27.0 cr

 

Preliminary Examination

At the end of the first year of study, each student will be given a written examination on a broad range of topics related to the first-year’s course work. A 70% average is required in order to pass this Preliminary Examination. The student must also achieve a grade of 70% or better on each of the questions posed by the examining committee. In case of a non-passing grade, it is entirely the option of the Department to allow a student to retake the entire examination or a portion thereof. Alternatively, the Department may elect to terminate the student’s matriculation. Passage of the examination is a prerequisite for taking the University Comprehensive Examination at the end of the second year of study.