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Department of Pharmacology

Department of Pharmacology
 

Graduate Training Curriculum

Electives


​Historically, the following courses have been particularly useful to Pharmacology graduate students. Check the course book for prerequisites and the semester in which each course is offered. There are a number of other courses that may be of value for your particular interests. Please keep in mind that course availability depends upon several factors and that not all courses are offered every year. Students may check with the course director or the Registrar's Office for the most current information on course offerings. A complete list of additional courses can be found in the UCD Course Book or online. You may request that a course in which you are interested by counted toward your degree progress even if it does not appear on the list below. Please contact the Graduate Training Coordinator or Graduate Program Director for more information.

BIOS 6601 Biostatistics Methods, Fall/Spring Sem., 4.0 cr.
Dr. J. Kittelson - 303 315 9030, Min: 9
An introduction to statistical methods in the health sciences emphasizing the use of statistics to answer research questions. Content includes descriptive and statistical inference; statistical methods include t-tests, chi-square tests, one-way ANOVA, and linear regression. Statistical software is used.

BMST 7350 Protein Chemistry I, Fall Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. R. Hodges - 303 724 3268., Min: 2/Max: 25
This course will provide the chemical and physical basis for protein structure, folding, function and stability. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms of protein folding and structure and an ability to devise strategies for stabilizing protein molecules.

BMST 7354 Structural Analysis of Biomolecules I, Fall Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. R. Hodges - 303 724 3268., Min: 2/Max: 25
Structural Analysis of Biomolecules I describes the fundamentals of spectroscopic methods used to study protein structure and function. These techniques include optical methods (CD spectroscopy, fluorescence and absorbance), vibrational methods (IR and ESR), analytical ultracentrifugation, mass spectrometry, calorimetry, light scattering and Biacore analysis.

BMST 7450 Protein Chemistry II, Spring Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. R. Hodges - 303 724 3268., Min: 2/Max: 25
Protein Chemistry II presents methods and principles of protein/peptide purification and enzyme catalysis, including electron transfer and mutagenesis. In addition, the investigation of protein and enzyme structure/function, the role of molecular dynamics, and the use of molecular simulations in investigations of protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions will be presented.

BMST 7454 Structural Analysis of Biomolecules II, Spring Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. R. Hodges - 303 724 3268., Min: 2/Max: 25
Methods and strategies for determination of the primary and 3-dimensional structures of biologically important molecules. Crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry will be taught in structural determination of proteins, nucleic acids complex carbohydrates, and lipid molecules.

CDBI 7605 Developmental Biology, Spring Sem., 3.0 cr.
Drs. S. Britt/J. Hooper - 303 724 3422. Prereq.: IDPT 7801, 7802, 7803.,, Min: 2/Max: 20
An issues-oriented introductory course including lectures, discussion of current literature, and student presentations. It will include: establishment of embryonic axes, gastrulation and germ layers, subdivision of the axes and secondary fields, induction pattern formation, sex determination, and germline vs. soma in both invertebrate and vertebrate systems.

IMMU 7629 Immunology, Fall Sem., 3.0 cr.
Dr. J. Cohen - 303 315 8898. Prereq.: Consent of the instructor.
A comprehensive course of basic and some clinical immunology with the stress on the human immune system. Graduate students take the same lectures as medical students.

MICB 7701 Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis, Spring Sem., 3.0 cr.
Dr. J. Schaack 303 724 4220. Prereq.: IDPT 7803 or consent of instructor, Min: 3/Max: 15
Molecular principles of viral pathogenesis. Topics include virus-host interactions, infectious diseases, cancer and virus replication. Students are assessed via in-class presentations, class participation, and a written exam.

PHSC 7350 Protein Chemistry I, Fall Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. J. Carpenter - 303 315 6075., Min: 2/Max: 25
This course will provide the chemical and physical bases for protein structure, folding, function and stability. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the mechanisms of protein folding and structure and an ability to devise strategies for stabilizing protein molecules.

PHCL 7606 Receptors and Cell Signaling, Spring Sem., 3.0 cr.
Dr. M. Dell'Acqua - 303 724 3616. Prereq.: IDPT 7801, 7802, 7803., Min: 4/
This elective course presents an indepth treatment of the role of receptors and signal transduction systems in the regulation of cell functions through faculty-presented lectures and student-led discussions of current literature.

PHSC 7330 Issues in Drug Development, Spring Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. J. Carpenter - 303 315 6075. Prereq.: Permission of instructor., Min: 5/Max: 25
A multidisciplinary approach to educating students about all aspects of drug development including federal drug regulatory issues, natural product screening, combinatorial chemistry, high throughput screening, invitro and in vivo pharmacology models, preclinical and clinical toxicology, dosage forms, and clinical trials design. Preparation for careers in the pharmaceutical industry and drug development process.

PHSC 7530 Cancer: Experimental and Medical Aspects, Spring Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. A. Malkinson - 303 315 4579. Prereq.: Permission of Course Coordinator, Min: 3/Max: 20
This is an interactive seminar course on recent topics in cancer biology. Topics include the biochemical and morphological description of tumors and tumor behavior, such as metastasis and angiogenesis, and tumor development. This course also covers aspects of carcinogenesis: mechanisms, modulation, testing and epidemiology, and chemotherapy.

TXCL 7561 Drug Metabolism & Pharmacogentics 2, Spring Sem., 2.0 cr.
Dr. D. Petersen - 303 315 6159 Crosslisted PHCL 7561., Min: 2/Max: 30
This interdisciplinary course is designed to provide the student with current information on the basic concepts of xenobiotic and drug metabolism pathways. Major emphasis is placed on the relationship of interindividual differences in the metabolism of therapeutic agents to pharmacologic response and toxicity.