Skip to main content
Sign In
 

Linda K. Johnson

Professor


​Education:
  • ​BS, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (1980)
  • DVM, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (1983)
  • MS, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS (1987)
  • MPH, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (1990)
  • Post-doctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (1990)
Professional Experience and Honors:
  • Postdoctoral Fellow in Comparative Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (1987-1990)
  • Board Certification in Veterinary Pathology and member, ACVP (1990)
  • Chief Pathologist, Registry of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (1991-1995)
  • Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Pathology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (1996-1998)
  • Consultant Veterinary Pathologist, American Registry of Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, DC (2000-2003)
  • Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Comparative Medicine, Yale University College of Medicine, New Haven, CT (2002-2003)
  • Consultant Veterinary Pathologist, Histopathology Department, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Weybridge, England (2003-2007)
  • Research Scientist, Division of Comparative Medicine, Yale University College of Medicine, New Haven, CT (2008-2009)
  • Head, Anatomic Pathology Division, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Associate Research Professor, Comparative Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Manhattan, NY (2009-2011)
  • Head of Discipline, Anatomy and Pathology, School of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia (2011-2014)
  • Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus (2015-present)
  • KSU College of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Recognition Award Recipient- 2016
Other Experiences and Professional Memberships:
  • Adjunct Professor, Kansas State University, James Cook University & Colorado State University (2015-present)
  • Affiliate Member, UCCC, Cancer Biology Program (2015-present)
  • Member CCTSI (2016-present)
  • ILAR (single issue) journal co-editor, Validation of Animal Models
  • Veterinary Pathology, “Pathology in Context” column editor (2012-2014)
  • Associate Laboratory member, Cancer Biology and Genetics Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute (2009-2011)
  • Board of Governors member (President 2010-11) to the ACVP/STP Coalition for Veterinary Pathology Fellows, (2009-2011)
  • C.L. Davis D.V.M. Foundation, National Advisory Board Member (1997- 2017); Trustee Member (2018-present)
  • Public Visibility Committee, ACVP (2007-2011)
  • Education Committee Member, ACVP (1997-1998)
  • Section Editor, Environmental Toxicologic Pathology, Toxicologic Pathology (1995-1998)
  • Environmental Toxicologic Pathology, ACVP Specialty Group Chairperson (1997)
  • Infectious Diseases, ACVP Specialty Group Chairperson (1995)
  • Associate Editor, Laboratory Animal Science (1991-1994)
  • ACVP Member; Successful Board-Certification Examination (1990)
Contributions to Science:

The UK suffers from high levels of wildlife-associated spread of bovine tuberculosis. Cattle movement, exportation and professions based upon animal husbandry have suffered.  My research was validation of a model of bovine tuberculosis that demonstrated lesion-level pathology, demonstrated consistent repeatability, and aided in providing correlates of reduced disease traits employed for vaccine studies. As a research team member, I demonstrated that in vitro data scoring correlated with in vivo lesions, and greater lesion-level pathology characterization aided comprehension of temporal and spatial disease advancement. My role was to collect tissues and provide gross and microscopic interpretation.
   
  • Johnson, L.K., Gough, J., Spencer, Y., Hewinson, G., Vordermeier, M., Wangoo, A. Immunohistochemical markers augment evaluation of vaccine efficacy and disease severity in bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccinated cattle challenged with Mycobacterium bovis. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology. 111: 219-229, 2006 PMID:16540176
  • Liebana, E., Marsh, S., Gough, J., Nunez, A., Vordermeier, M., Whelan, A., Spencer, Y., Clifton-Hadley, R., Hewinson, G., Johnson, L. Distribution and activation of T-lymphocyte subsets in tuberculous bovine lymph node granulomas. Veterinary Pathology, 44:366-372, 2007 PMID:17491079
  • Liebana E., Johnson L.K., Gough J., Durr P., Jahans K., Clifton-Hadley R., Spencer Y., Hewinson R., Downs S.  Pathology of naturally occurring bovine tuberculosis in England and Wales. The Veterinary Journal, 176:354-360, 2008 PMID:17728162
Documentation of the extent and severity of T lymphocyte infiltration into the brain in acute GVHD of mice.  This research demonstrated the presence and extent of T lymphocytes within the brain, especially within the cerebellum.  My role was to perform the gross necropsy, evaluate H&E stained slides and provide IHC.
  
  • Hartrampf, S., Dudakov, J.A., Johnson, L.K., Smith, O.M., Tsai, J., Singer, N.V., West, M.L., Hanash, A., Albert, M.H., Liu, B., Toth, M., van den Brink, M.R. The central nervous system is a target of acute graft versus host disease in mice. Blood. 121(10):1906-10, 2013. PMID:23299314
  • Hartrampf, S., Dudakov, J.A., Johnson, L.K., Smith, O.M., Tsai, J., Singer, N.V., West, M.L., Hanash, A., Albert, M.H., Liu, B., Toth, M., van den Brink, M.R. The CNS in acute GVHD:  Development and effects.  Biol Blood Bone Marrow Transplant (18)S359, 2012 PMID:23299314

MyD88 deficient mice are frequently models of immune-mediated disease.  Reports of altered gastrointestinal mucus, and the impact of deficient innate immunity have contributed to greater understanding of the transfer of intestinal gram-negative bacteria to extra-intestinal locations. My role in this initial diagnostic case, which then highlighted the value of full necropsy for all unanticipated mortalities, was to collect tissues, culture and gram stain exudate and interpret lesions.  The hyperplasia and hypertrophy of mesothelial cells was a previously unreported finding and highlighted the need for bacterial genetic characterization.

L.K., Johnson, A. Widi, S., Rowarth, A. Baxter.  Abdominal distension and E. coli peritonitis in MyD88 deficient mice.  Comp Med.; 65 (2):123-126, 2015 PMID:25926397

Partial listing of publications is available through this link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/collections/bibliography/48669339/