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Department of Microbiology, A Leader in Microbiology and Microbial Pathogenesis Research and Training.

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Thomas Campbell, M.D.

Professor of Medicine


 

Contact
   Phone: (303) 724-4929
   E-mail: thomas.campbell@ucdenver.edu

Affiliations

Thomas Campbell, M.D. earned his M.D. degree from XXXXXXX, in 1995. He completed X years of postdoctoral research training at the University of XXXXXXXX, (1996),

Dr. Campbell joined the faculty of the University of Colorado School of Medicine Department of Microbiology in 2002.

Human Herpesvirus 8 and Kaposi's Sarcoma- Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer in persons with AIDS worldwide. Although immune reconstitution with highly active antiretroviral therapy has greatly reduced the incidence of KS in the United States and Western Europe, KS remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with AIDS in developing countries. The occurrence of KS in persons with, and without AIDS has been linked to infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8; also called Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus or KSHV). Available data provide strong evidence that HHV-8 is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and that coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HHV-8 greatly increases the risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma. In collaboration with researchers at the University of Zimbabwe Medical School, we are conducting studies on the role of HHV-8 replication in KS pathogenesis in HIV-1-infected persons. Studies to determine the effect of immune reconstitution with antiretroviral drugs on HHV-8 replication are also in progress.

HIV-1 Replication Fitness- Available data suggest that viral replicative fitness is an important determinant of HIV-1 virulence, and modulation of HIV-1 fitness with antiretroviral drugs may be a way to attenuate HIV-1 pathogenesis. However, little is known about the effects of viral replicative fitness on the pathogenesis of primary HIV-1 infection. We are conducting studies to test the hypothesis that the replicative fitness of transmitted HIV-1 is important for the immunopathogenesis and natural history of HIV-1 infection.

Dr. Campbell has received many awards and honors throughout his career, including XXXX.