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Center for Women’s Health Research

Center for Womens Health Research
 

Accomplishments

Congratulations to the following CWHR faculty for their recent awards


Judy Regensteiner, PhD
Judy Regensteiner, PhD

Judy Regensteiner, PhD, and Anne Libby, PhD (co-PI), recently received a 2015 Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Their grant will provide flexible research funds to increase the retention and career advancement of young physician-scientist faculty members at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus working in clinical research and facing windows of vulnerability.

Teri Hernandez, PhD
Teri Hernandez, PhD

Teri Hernandez, PhD recently received an R-01 grant for her project, “Randomized Trial of Diet in Gestational Diabetes: Metabolic Consequences to Mother and Offspring.”

Kristen Demoruelle, MD 
Kristen Demoruelle, MD

Kristen Demoruelle, MD recently received a K23 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award for her project “The Lung as an Originating Site of Autoimmunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis.”

Jacinda Nicklas, MD 
Jacinda Nicklas, MD

Jacinda Nicklas, MD, MPH, MS was named the newest National Institutes of Health’s BIRCWH scholar (Building Research Careers in Women’s Health). Her project title is "Fit After Baby: A Mobile Health (mHealth) Lifestyle Intervention Program to Increase Postpartum Weight Loss in Women at Elevated Risk for Cardiometabolic Disease."

Brian Stauffer, MD 
Brian Stauffer, MD

Brian Stauffer, MD received a R01 grant for his research, “Molecular and Functional Mechanisms of Pediatric Heart Failure”. The general aim of this project is evaluate sex differences in the failing human pediatric heart.

Amy Huebschmann, MD 
Amy Huebschmann, MD

Amy Huebschmann, MD was awarded a K23 Career Development award from the National Institutes of Health – National Heart, Lung, Blood Institute for her project “Targeting Physical Activity to Improve Cardiovascular Health in Type 2 Diabetes.” 

The K23 research objective is to develop and validate a Type 2 Diabetes-specific version of an existing, valid barriers/facilitators survey and to pilot-test an intervention targeting primary care patients’ responses to the diabetes-specific survey. 

The long-term goal is to improve cardiovascular health for people with type 2 diabetes by developing, testing, and integrating targeted physical activity interventions into primary care practices.

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