Skip to main content
Sign In
 

Research and Scholarship


​The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus has made a significant commitment to personalized medicine, including the creation of a biobank collected from medical patients of all ages.  The Center for Bioethics and Humanities is integrating its research on the ethical challenges of this valuable endeavor including: level of informed consent for tissue donation, privacy for storing huge quantities of data linked to medical records, re-contact of biobank donors with clinically actionable results, access to genomic testing and targeted therapies, some of which are hyper-expensive.

In addition, Colorado presents the opportunity for cutting edge research on the potential for harm from legal marijuana commercialization in Colorado, especially with regard to adolescents.

Past and Present Funded Research

Education
• Spirituality Curriculum (GWISH/Templeton), funded by Templeton Foundation
• Interprofessional Education, funded by Macy Foundation
Health Humanities
• Disability Studies Working Group of University of Colorado, funded by President's Fund for the Humanities Grants (2011-2012).
• Research support, editorial assistance, travel, and indexing fees for the Health Humanities Reader (published by Rutgers U Press), funded by Arnold P. Gold Foundation (2012-2014).
Genetics and Ethics
• Anxiety related to genetic testing for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, funded by Alpha-1 Research Foundation
• Informed consent in Alpha-1 testing of at-risk children, funded by Alpha-1 Research Foundation
• Directives for retained DNA for addiction research, funded by NIDA
• Participant perspectives on ethical issues in substance use disorder genetic research, funded by NIDA
• Reporting actionable genomic research results, funded by NIDA
• Adolescent perspectives on return of research results in genomic addiction research, funded by NIDA
• Adolescent perspectives on conflict of interest in genomic addiction research, funded by NIDA
• Understanding risks of broad data sharing for genomic addiction research, funded by NIDA
 

Scholarship

Marilyn Coors, PhD is the author of 3 recently published articles.  They include:
1) What Adolescents Enrolled in Genomic Addiction Research Want to Know about Conflicts of Interest by Coors ME, Raymond KM, McWilliams SK, Hopfer CJ, Mikulich- Gilbertson SK. (2015).  Drug and Alcohol Dependence 147:272-5. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.12.004. Epub 2014 Dec 15.

2) Adolescent Perspectives on the Return of Individual Results in Genomic Addiction Research by Coors ME. Raymond KM, McWilliams SK, Hopfer CJ, Mikulich- Gilbertson SK. (2015). Psychiatric Genetics, in press.

3) Ethical Precepts for Medical Volunteerism: Including Local Voices and Values to Guide RHD Surgery in Rwanda by Coors ME, Matthew T, Matthew D. Ethical Precepts for Medical Volunteerism: Including Local Voices and Values to Guide RHD Surgery in Rwanda. Journal of Medical Ethics,
J Med Ethics 2015;41:814–819.

Recent White Paper:
The Unrepresented Patient:  A White Paper​ from the Colorado Collaborative for Unrepresented Patients by Jackie Glover, PhD and Jean Abbott, MD, MH

This year, the Colorado Collaborative for Unrepresented Patients (CCUP), a task force of representatives of the Colorado healthcare ethics community led by the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at the University of Colorado at Anschutz Medical Campus, the Center for Ethics and Leadership in the Health Professions at Regis University, and the Colorado Healthcare Ethics Forum. set a goal of investigating best practices from around the country and develop a concept paper to address the growing issue of unrepresented patients in Colorado healthcare systems. 

The resulting White Paper​ was accepted last summer as an Appendix to the report of the Elder Abuse Task Force, chaired by The Honorable Elizabeth Leith of the Denver Probate Court.  This Task Force recommended a structure for a new Office of Public Guardianship, and the addition of our White Paper recognized the special needs for nimble and ethical decision-making in the medical setting for the unrepresented group of vulnerable patients.  In the next year, our CCUP hopes to develop training standards for medical guardians under the new Office and continue to participate in seeing the pilots and eventual state-wide program become a reality.​