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University of Colorado Denver

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Public Health Systems and Services Research


Organizational Network Analysis of the KIDS COUNT Grantee Network

kids-count-logo.pngTime Frame
2015-2016

 
Funded By
Annie E. Casey Foundation
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems (Early Childhood Systems)
 
Project Partners
Ida Drury, Kempe Center
 
Project Description
In partnership with KIDS COUNT, the University of Colorado Denver’s Center on Collaborative Governance’s Team will complete the planning and initial implementation for the organizational network evaluation of the KCGN that will (1) assess the partnership engagement process and the level of communication among partners in the KCGN; (2) assess changes in activities, policies, programs, or systems that have occurred as a result of the initiative; (3) identify facilitators and barriers faced by members of the KCGN; and (4) use the information developed through this research to inform future partner efforts.
 
This KCN is complex, involving leadership from the Annie E Casey Foundation, membership from state-based child advocacy, nonprofit, and research organizations. In total, there are grantees in every US state, as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, each who have developed partnerships at multiple levels throughout the state system. These networks of partners in each state are helping lawmakers, public agencies, and nonprofits understand the nation’s changing demographic profile to encourage more effective programs and policies. KIDS COUNT grantees are building strong relationships with stakeholders to move the discussion from data to larger social change and legislation (http://www.aecf.org/work/kids-count/kids-count-network/).
 

Hospital Investment & Interaction in Public Health Systems

 Robert-Wood-Johnson-Foundation-300x202.pngTime Frame
2014-2016
 
Funded By
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems
 
Project Partners
CO School of Public Health (Greg Tung, Adam Atherly); Rachel Hogg at UK; Lisa VR at CALPHO
 
Project Description
This project focuses on the growing need to understand the role that hospitals play in the public health system.  The proposed study addresses key questions raised in the PHSSR Research Agenda on the organization and structure of public health systems: 1) How do inter-organizational relationships and patterns of interaction within public health delivery systems impact the effectiveness, efficiency, and outcomes of public health strategies delivered at local, state, and national levels? 2) What conditions and strategies facilitate productive inter-organizational relationships and patterns of interaction among organizations that contribute to public health strategies at local, state, and national levels?  Additionally, this proposal addressing one of the two research priorities identified by RWJF, NNPHI, and the Coordinating Center.  Specifically, “Bridging Public Health and Health Care Systems” and questions such as “What factors facilitate or inhibit the success of strategies to integrate public health and primary care delivery?”, “How do public health delivery system characteristics and capabilities facilitate or inhibit the implementation of novel health care innovations?”, and “How does ACA implementation impact the organization, financing, and delivery of high-value public health strategies and foundational capabilities?” are addressed by this work.
 
Information gleaned from this research will be useful to public health systems and hospital leaders interested in engaging improving Hospital-PH interaction and investment, and will help identify those factors that facilitate and inhibit public health and health care system integration. Findings from this study will provide key information about factors important to successful collaboration efforts that can be used to increase hospital community benefit expenditures and ultimately positively impact population health in communities. Analysis will help fill substantial gaps in research and help stakeholders better understand how context and mechanisms can make initiatives to increase hospital participation in public health systems and population health activities, like those tied to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more effective and successful. Although this analysis focuses specifically on understanding how PH-Hospital partnerships influence a public health outcome, some of the results may be generalizable to other public health activities that utilize partnerships with other public and private organizations through community level processes.
 

Million Hearts Initiative
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index.pngMillionHeartsInitiative.png
 
Time Frame
2015-2017
 
Funded By
Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE); Centers for Disease Control (CDC)
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems
 
Project Partners
RAND (Malcolm Williams)
 
Project Description
In partnership with RAND, the University of Colorado Denver’s Center on Collaborative Governance’s Team will complete the planning and initial implementation for the organizational network evaluation of the Million Hearts network to (1) assess the partnership engagement process and the level and strength of interaction among partners in the MH; (2) assess changes in activities, policies, programs, or systems that have occurred as a result of the MH; (3) identify facilitators and barriers of public–private partnerships with the federal government; and (4) use the information developed through the above three aims to inform future partner efforts.
 
To accomplish these aims and answer these questions, we propose a mixed-methods design. This will include an environmental scan (including a literature review of both peer-reviewed and grey literature), key informant interviews (e.g., state, local and national stakeholders or policymakers), and an SNA of the MHI. These tasks as interrelated, with the environmental scan informing the protocols for the qualitative interviews and SNA and identifying participants for both; the qualitative interviews, in turn, will refine the protocol for the SNA and further aid in bounding the network for it.
 

Social Network Analysis & TA for Early Childhood Councils

 
CDHS-square-logo.pngTime-Frame:
2012-2015
 
 
Funded By:
CO Trust, CO Department of Human Services, CO Department of Public Health and the Environment
 
Research/Evaluation Area:
Public Health Systems
(sub-area: Early Childhood Systems)
 
 
Project Partners:
Darrin Hicks (DU); Jodi Hardin (Civic Canopy)
 
Project Description:
Colorado-Office-of-Early-Childhood-DHS-2The Early Childhood Councils in Colorado were legislated to support systems building and develop relationships that improve services and better coordinate resources for children and their families.  As part of a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) effort, a Social Network Analysis was conducted to identify system relationships and develop an evidence base for systems building efforts. With support from the Colorado Department of Human Services, the PARTNER team met with Early Childhood Councils (ECC) in MIECHV (CDPEH) or Health Integration (CO Trust) funded communities to identify members of the early childhood system, develop a map of the “ideal” system, and participate in data collection to assess system relationships. The ECC Coordinator from each community served as the Point of Contact to coordinate a stakeholder meeting and administer a survey to ECC members.  The survey combines the PARTNER survey with the Process Quality/Working Together survey already administered to the ECCs. Each community received a Personalized Coalition Evaluation/Assessment and recommendations for actions steps to engage in systems building.
 

DIRECTV: Practice-Based Research Networks in Public Health: Public Health Dissemination and Implementation Research to Improve Value (DIRECTIVE) Studies: Leveraging Practice Based Research Networks to Understand the Value of Public Health Delivery

Robert-Wood-Johnson-Foundation-300x202.pngTime-Frame
2013-2015

Funded By
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems
 
Project Partners
Rachel Hogg, UK; Lisa VR, CALPHO
 
Project Description
This project seeks to examine and compare the interactions and differences in local health department (LHD) measures of Accreditation Readiness (AR) and Quality Improvement (QI) in three states (Colorado, Nebraska, and Kansas), based on varying system-level D&I support initiatives and the resulting social/professional network of LHDs and state-level partners. In addition, the project will examine differences in financial investment in the system-level D&I initiatives and the cost of discrete QI projects at the local level using methods from DACS projects. Finally, the project will examine the connection between LHD’s QI project topics, QI maturity and AR with related (and unrelated) service measures and health outcomes from a set of the measures developed in the MPROVE project. The purpose of this project is to understand the links between system-level D&I initiatives and investments and QI and accreditation activities at the LHD level.  The PARTNER team will partner to understand the overall relationship and also explore one important aspect of the casual pathway, network connections among LHDs and between LHDs, to understand how state-level partners can modify the relationship between system-level D&I investments/initiatives and LHD QI maturity and AR.
 

Assessing The System Of Care For Babies And Young Children With Special Healthcare And Developmental Needs:  WONDERBabies Partnership    

colorado-trust-squre-logo.pngTime Frame
2008-Present
 
Funded By
Colorado Trust and Family Voices
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems
Sub: Early Childhood Systems
 
 
Project Partners
Ayelet Talmi (SOM, CU)
 
Project Description
With support from The Colorado Trust, the WONDERbabies Partnership for Health exists to coordinate, link, plan, design and implement a system of care for babies and young children with special health care and developmental needs and their families. WONDERbabies Partnership for Health hopes to improve the communication and coordination of systems and services for young children with special health care needs and their families through systems building and change, education and training, and data collection and evaluation.  Using PARTNER, WONDERbabies conducted a social network analysis to look at relationships among families and stakeholders in the system of care for babies and young children with special health care and developmental needs in Colorado. To date, 723 partnerships among 450 stakeholders have been identified and analyzed. The PARTNER results showed how services for children with special health care needs differ vastly between counties in Colorado. As a result, the WONDERbabies website was modified to be more user-friendly for families trying to navigate services (i.e., they click on the county they live in and a list of services available to their specific county comes up).  This work has been published in Frontiers in Public Health Systems and Services Research.​
 

Collaborative Approaches in Chronic Disease Prevention: Factors Affecting Implementation of Evidence-based Practices in Local Public Health Coalitions

 
Robert-Wood-Johnson-Foundation-300x202.pngTime Frame
N/A
 
Funded By
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
 
Research/Evaluation Area
Public Health Systems
 
Project Partners
CALPHO, CO School of Public Health
 
Product Description
This project is a research project of the Colorado Public Health Practice Based Research Network (COPHPBRN). COPHPBRN brings together individuals in public health practice and research throughout the state of Colorado to identify relevant questions in practice and connect them with rigorous research that is immediately applicable to practice. This project combines two important topics in public health – evidence-based practice (EBP) and coalition/partnership work. The research will examine how coalitions find, select, share and use evidence-based chronic disease and related risk factor prevention activities. In addition, it will study the role of local public health agencies in coalitions, and their influence on EBP use and adoption. The project will use data from a survey of local public health agency directors and coalition coordinators, a network analysis using the PARTNER tool of eight to ten community coalitions, and interview data collected in a subsample of communities. The project addresses a topic of national significance as public health agencies seek to expand their capacity for supporting evidence-based chronic disease prevention practices through community partnerships. Measuring use of evidence-based practice in public health has become an increasingly important topic of interest within public health systems research. Though it is increasingly important, methodologies for measurement of use and communication of EBPs continue to be problematic.
 
This project explores how social network analysis can be used as a tool to understand the use, communication and dissemination of EBPs within a coalition setting. The PARTNER tools has allowed this project to think outside of solely how EBP is used into how this information is shared and communicated throughout coalitions/partnerships. We hope that the coalitions we work with through this project will use the data from PARTNER to strengthen their own partnerships as well as understanding how to use and spread EBP throughout their coalitions and partners in all of the work they do.
 

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