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University of Colorado Denver

School of Public Affairs
 

Schedule


General Schedule

Tentative Draft of Spring 2014 Schedule

Monday
11:00-1:00 Intros/Lunch (Janice Popp)
1:00-2:00 Networks 101 (Brint Milward)
2:00-3:15 Network Way of Working/Building a Network Culture (Janice Popp)
3:15 -3:30 Break
3:30-5:00 Neural Networks (Joan King)
5:00-6:00 Practitioner Sharing Hour

Tuesday
8:15-9:00 Breakfast
9:00-9:15 Welcome/Agenda/Recap
9:15-10:30 Network Effectiveness; Structure & Governance (Brint Milward)
10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-12:00 Affective Contagion in Networks; Evaluating Process Quality (Darrin Hicks)
12:00-12:45 Lunch
12:45-2:15 Social Network Analysis (Danielle Varda)
2:15-2:30 Break
2:30-5:00 Building Partnerships Case Study with 3D Network Construction
5:30 - 7:00 Rock Bottom Brewery Social

Wednesday
9:00-9:30 Breakfast/Recap
9:30-11:30 AM Workshops (NL for Funders, NL in Public Services Sector; NL Tools & Technologies; PARTNER AM)
11:30-12:00 Box Lunch
12:00-2:00 PM Workshops (NL for Environ/Natural Resource Management; Skills for Facilitating Networks; Heroic Improvisation; PARTNER PM)
2:00-3:00 Closing Plenary (Milward, Popp, Hicks, Varda - other trainers)

Workshop Descriptions:

To register only for the workshops, click HERE.

Network Leadership for Funders: Taught by Sandra Mikush, Deputy Director at the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation - flyer

Grantmakers today are looking for the best models and practice when shaping their funding models. A pressing question for grantmakers/funders is how they can nurture, support, and grow community networks.  Join Sandra Mikush for a training on building a collaborative funding model, with proven experiences and expertise.

Description: Drawing from literature and our own experience around networks and collective impact, this workshop will explore the changing nature of social change and the role of philanthropy. Participants will leave with specific ideas about how funders can adapt tools, activities, relationships and operations to increase our impact in an increasingly networked world.

Why take this workshop: Effective grantmakers are continually looking for new models and practices to adapt to a changing world. A pressing question for funders is how to nurture, support, and grow community networks for greater impact.  Join Sandra Mikush for a workshop that draws on her own experiences at the Babcock Foundation and with nonprofit and philanthropic partners in the field.

Network Leadership Tools and Technologies:  Taught by Judah Thornewill, PhD, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of GroupPlus, LLC 

Technology for collaborating is developed faster than we can keep up. In this workshop, the latest and most innovative tools for working together in a virtual space are introduced, demoed, and discussed.

Network Leadership in Public Service Sectors: Taught by Bill Fulton, Co-Director of The Civic Canopy 

Today working across boundaries is often a requirement for funding or legislated as a core activity. Join Bill Fulton of Civic Canopy for a training on civic collaboration, along with others who are working in public sector networks.

Description: This workshop will explore the challenges and opportunities that go with any attempt to impact outcomes within the public service sectors, and present a model for helping collaborative networks work across silos, sectors, and funding streams to achieve results that no one partner could achieve alone.

Why take this workshop: This workshop is designed for anyone interested in the challenge of mobilizing the many to work as one—whether through a collective impact framework, a Results-Based Accountability framework, or other models and methods.  All of these approaches require leadership that enables learning and adaptation to occur across the network of players. The workshop will include case studies from a range of public service initiatives for which the Civic Canopy provides staffing support, but the majority of time will be spent in discussion and in sharing ideas for a common toolbox of effective collaborative strategies.

Skills for Facilitating Networks: Taught by Lisa Carlson, Director of Facilitation at Engaged Public.

We are asked to be members of networks, lead networks, and manage networks. Yet, these unique types of collaborations are often difficult to work in, especially when conflict and tension are reasonable expectations. Join Lisa Carlson in this workshop to learn the ins-and-outs of facilitating diverse groups, negotiation and conflict resolution, and reaching collective decision making.

Network Leadership for Environmental and Natural Resource Management:  Taught by Tanya Heikkila, PhD.,  Associate Professor at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver - flyer

Join Tanya Heikkila in this workshop to learn the organization, design, and characteristics of success of networks for collaborative environmental natural resource management. The lessons from this workshop will draw from an extensive body of research and experience on environmental networks and collaboration, and from the interactions among network participants, to identify practical leadership skills to help overcome some of these challenges.

Description: This workshop will cover material on the organization, design, and characteristics of success of networks for collaborative environmental natural resource management.  You will gain important knowledge on 1) how organizational leaders can incentivize stakeholders and partners to engage and develop networks, 2) what types of communication tools are essential for managing conflict and sustaining participation in a collaborative, and 3) what rules and organizational design principles leaders can adopt to foster successful environmental management networks. The workshop will be interactive and participants will be encouraged to share their own lessons and insights with each other on these key questions.

Why take this workshop: In Colorado and across the U.S., there are growing concerns over how to manage the environment to protect public health or mitigate disasters and to meet the demands of growing populations for water, food, recreation and energy supplies. The complexity of these issues often requires networks and collaboration among multiple organizational sectors and professional domains.  These may include regulators, non-profits, public health officials, emergency management officials, natural resource managers, and educators, just to name a few.  Yet developing such networks and sustaining them can be particularly challenging, especially where organizational interests and goals are not aligned or are in conflict. The lessons from this workshop will draw from an extensive body of research and experience on environmental networks and collaboration, and from the interactions among network participants, to identify practical leadership skills to help overcome some of these challenges.In Colorado and across the U.S., there are growing concerns over how to manage the environment to protect public health or mitigate disasters and to meet the demands of growing populations for water, food, recreation and energy supplies.  Yet developing such networks and sustaining them can be particularly challenging, especially where organizational interests and goals are not aligned or are in conflict. 

Heroic Improvisation:  Taught by Mary Tyszkiewicz, Ph.D., Senior Analyst at the Homeland Security Institute - flyer

The foundation of Heroic Improvisation process is theater improvisation games applied to disasters. Improvisation skills for groups track with actions needed for innovative disaster response. The Heroic Improvisation workshop puts groups in chaotic situations and gives participants the felt-sense of moving into action together in high stakes situations. Improvisation exercises enable us to practice the skills of individual awareness, responsive leadership, and coordinated action that are required during disasters.  For more information go here: http://heroic-improv.com

Description: The Heroic Improvisation workshop gives participants the experience of creatively working together in a crisis using a structured process.  (See www.heroic-improv.com)  Using theater improvisation techniques, the group generates fun while preparing for disaster.  Participants will experience the 5 step process -   1. Alert, 2. Ready, 3. Connect, 4. Focus, 5. Move - to make choices together during crisis.  People can get ready for unimaginable events through learning group improvisation.  No disaster skill or performance ability needed.  Come prepared for movement in loose clothing and athletic shoes (no heels or flip-flops!).

Why take this workshop:  Current disaster exercises focus on knowledge (e.g. what to do in case of a flood) and skills (e.g. first aid).  The Heroic Improvisation workshop fills a gap by motivating people to practice with fun activities to enable a calm and focused attitude in crisis situations.  The workshop puts groups in chaotic situations and gives participants the felt-sense of moving into action together in high stakes situations. Improvisation exercises use imagination powerfully to enable all to practice the skills of individual awareness, fluid leadership, and coordinated action that are required during disasters

PARTNER: A Tool for Organizational SNA: Taught by: Danielle Varda, PhD., Assistant Professor at University of Colorado Denver, Director of Research Program on Collaborative Governance - flyer
 
At the end of this full day workshop, you will know how to administer, interpret, and analyze data from the PARTNER (Program to Analyze, Record, and Track Networks to Enhance Relationships). Dr. Varda will walk you through how to use the program, how to interpret the data, and will demonstrate a Quality Improvement methodology for using social network data to translate into practice.  For more information about PARTNER go to: www.partnertool.net
 
Description: This workshop will cover the steps on how to use the PARTNER tool to measure and monitor collaboration among people/organizations to demonstrate how members are connected, how resources are leveraged and exchanged, the levels of value and trust, and to link outcomes to the process of collaboration. You will gain essential knowledge on how to use social network analysis and PARTNER for Quality Improvement.
 
Why take this workshop: A major challenge facing organizations today is how to partner with other organizations, agencies, and groups to collaboratively address social and political goals while effectively maximizing resource sharing of the partners involved.  However, the process by which organizations have engaged partners in collaboration has varied, with few ways to measure the success of these partnerships. Public leaders are eager to understand how to analyze the collaboratives in which they are involved so that they may determine whether efforts to focus resources on partnership or collaborative development are working. Using PARTNER for Quality Improvement is a great resource to measure where you are now, where you want to be, and gives you the data to make evidence based decisions as you develop action steps to implement change within your network.
 

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