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You have reached the Web site for the Department of Pathology at the University of Colorado Denver.

The Graduate School at UC Denver
 

Cancer Biology Program

Graduate Training in Biomedical Research Leading to a Ph.D.


​Faculty

  
  
Steve Anderson, PhDMy lab is interested in signaling pathways that regulate mammary gland development and tumorigenesis
David Bentley, PhDOur research asks how the RNA polymerase II transcriptional machinery and RNA processing factors work together to achieve coordinated synthesis and maturation of messenger RNA (mRNA).
Kathrin Bernt, MDOur research focuses on understanding molecular mechanisms of hematopoietic and leukemia development and the discovery of new therapeutic approaches
Andrew Bradford, PhDMy research interests focus on hormone/growth factor signaling and cancer
James Costello, PhDWithin the broad scope of systems biology, my lab focuses on 3 research areas: 1) Network inference for identifying drug targets, 2) Predicting drug sensitivity from -omics datasets, and 3) Modeling temporal effects of drug combinations
Scott Cramer PhDProstate Cancer Tumor Suppressors, Stem Cells, Tumor Initiating cells, Signal Transduction, Receptor Signaling
James DeGregori, PhDStudies to better understand the conditions that foster the initiation of leukemias and lymphomas are currently a major thrust of the lab
Robert Doebele, MD, PhDThe overall focus of my laboratory is the study of oncogenic gene fusions in lung cancer including ALK, ROS1, RET and NTRK1
Joaquin Espinosa, Ph.D.​Our main research goal is to understand how gene networks control cell behavior in homeostasis and human disease. Our two main focus areas are cancer biology and Down syndrome.
Heide Ford, PhDOur laboratory focuses on a specific family of homeoproteins, the Six family, and their transcriptional cofactors, Eya and Dach. The Six1 homeobox gene is overexpressed in 50% of primary breast cancers and 90% of metastatic lesions, and its overexpression
Douglas Graham, MD, PhDThe Graham lab focuses on the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro-3, Axl, and Mer) and their roles in development and progression of human cancer
Arthur Gutierrez-Hartmann, MDDr. Gutierrez-Hartmann’s laboratory focuses on two main projects: (1) elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing pituitary-specific gene expression; and, (2) determining the role of Ets transcription factors in breast cancer.
Bryan Haugen, MDThyroid Diseases; Endocrine Neoplasms
Lynn Heasley, PhDMy lab investigates autocrine and paracrine signaling through receptor tyrosine kinases, both as oncogene drivers and as acquired or intrinsic resistance mechanisms to targeted therapeutics
Cheng-Jun Hu, PhDTo distinguish the role of HIF-1a and HIF-2a in cancer progression, our work has been focusing on these specific areas:
Paul Jedlicka, MD, PhDCurrently, our laboratory is broadly interested in further understanding the biology of Jumonji-domain histone demethylases in regulation of gene expression and cancer phenotypes in Ewing Sarcoma
Antonio Jimeno MDHe has made a special emphasis in 1) developing better preclinical models, 2) determining predictors of response, and 3) devising ways to integrate that knowledge into clinical trials to individualize anti-cancer therapy.
Craig T. Jordan, PhDSince first establishing my independent laboratory in 1997, my research has been focused on characterization and targeting of leukemia stem cells (LSCs).
Sana Karam, M.D/Ph.D.Dr. K​aram’s laboratory is focused on basic and translational research related to head and neck and CNS cancer
James Lambert, PhDThe role of prostate derived factor in prostatic inflammation and tumorigenicity
Chuan-Yuan Li, PhDNovel approaches to enhance conventional cancer therapy
Bolin Liu, MDOur primary research interests focus on erbB receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs)-mediated signal transduction in breast cancer and miRNA-mediated epigenetic regulation of drug resistance and metastasis
Shi-Long Lu, MD, PhDRole of PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway in HNSCC progression.
M. Scott Lucia, MDDirector, Prostate Diagnostic Laboratory
Stephen Malkoski, MD, PhDI am interested in the identification of cancer stem cells in lung squamous cell carcinoma and targeting of these stem cells in preclinical chemotherapeutic trials
Tobias Neff, MD•Epigenetic mechanisms in leukemia and normal development
Raphael Nemenoff, PhDMy laboratory is focused on examining molecular pathways that regulate the progression and metastasis of lung cancer.
David Orlicky, PhDThe study of lipid accumulation in non-adipocytes and how that process is regulated in multiple tissues, and in normal and pathologic situations
Rytis Prekeris, PhD
Mary Reyland, PhD
Jennifer Richer, PhD
Dennis Roop, PhD
Carol Sartorius, PhD
Rebecca Schweppe PhD
Robert A. Sclafani, PhDThe main area of focus of the laboratory is the regulation and mechanisms of chromosomal DNA replication, mutagenesis and DNA repair in yeast and human cells.
Daniel Sherbenou, M.D.,Ph.D.I oversee a translational research laboratory focused on novel therapy development and optimization for multiple myeloma and care for patients with myeloma and related plasma cell disorders from Colorado and adjoining areas.​
Jill Slansky, PhDUsing an animal model for colon cancer, we are determining what substitutions in tumor antigen peptides improve antitumor immunity
Aik-Choon Tan PhDHis lab develops and applies computational/machine learning and statistical methods to integrate high-throughout and complex biological data sources for biomarker discovery and the identification of aberrant signaling pathways in tumors.
Dan Theodorescu, MD, PhD
Andrew Thorburn, PhDOur laboratory studies the regulation of apoptosis and other forms of cell death as it relates to two important issues in cancer biology¬– the development of cancer and the response of cancer cells to therapy
Jing Hong Wang,MD, PhDMolecular mechanism of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination:
Xiao-Jing Wang, MD, PhDMolecular mechanisms of cancer: 1) Identification of biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy for human head and neck​ cancer; 2) the properties of cancer stem cells, transcriptional machinery, microRNA functions; 3) Experimental therapeutics of head and neck

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