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University of Colorado Denver College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

 

Sustainability Minor

Elective Course Descriptions


 

 Most of the following courses listed are offered regularly.

 

 Sustainability [SUST]

3010 The Non-Sustainable Past
This is the first of a two-course sequence that assesses the interrelations among the historical, political, cultural, ecological, and economic aspects of contemporary environmental issues. SUST I focuses on the non-sustainable use of water, land, energy, manufactured goods, and food. Prereq: 1 Natural Science Core and 1 Social Science Core. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3011 Toward a Sustainable Future
This is the second of a two-course sequence that examines the interrelations among the historical, political, cultural, ecological, and economic aspects of contemporary environmental issues. Provides students with theoretical perspectives on sustainability through a series of current, problem-oriented case studies. Prereq: One natural science core and one social science core. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4960 Capstone in Sustainability
As the culmination of the Sustainability Minor, this course examines current research practices in sustainability and sustainability-related fields. Students work in teams to complete a sustainability/sustainability-related research paper and poster and present it to the campus community. Note: Topics variable depending on region under study, student interest, and faculty specialty. Prereq: SUST 3011. Semester Hours: 3 to 3​

1

 Anthropology [ANTH]

3006 Sustainable Development and Culture
Investigates theories, issues and problems in development and its relationship to social and environmental problems. Considers the connections between development and underdevelopment, the success and failures of development policies and five case studies in development. Prereq: Anthropology and microeconomics or macroeconomics. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3210 Urban Food Systems and Sustainability
Urbanites are increasingly removed from the complex of factors that provide us food. Being concerned about sustainability, we need to understand the complex webs in food systems and their implications for the health and natural systems. This problem-based course will wrestle with urban food systems organized to address the 3 E’s of sustainability: environmental, economic, and equity. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4010/5014 Medical Anthropology: Global Health
This course is concerned with the underlying biological and cultural determinants of health throughout the human life cycle in global and cross-cultural perspective. Note: The first of a two-course sequence in medical anthropology and global health studies; the second is ANTH 4020. Prereq: Upper division and/or graduate standing. Cross-listed with ANTH 5014, HBSC 4010 and 5010. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4020/5014 Global Health Studies II: Comparative Health Systems
(Note: Course description pending.​​

4030/5030 Ethnobiology
Considers the relationship between human society and plants and animals in the natural world. Primary focus on the perception and cognitive organization of the environment and how that affects the definition and use of plants and animals as resources. Prereq: Introductory anthropology and/or biology. Cross-listed with ANTH 5030. Semester Hours: 3 to 3​​

4040/5040 Anthropology of Food and Nutrition
Examines the myriad relationships between food as a biological necessity and eating as a socially and culturally conditioned activity. Takes a biocultural perspective that considers not only the tremendous variety of foods we eat, but also the complex meanings and importance attached to food and eating. Prereq: Introductory course in anthropology. Cross-listed with ANTH 5040. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4050/5050 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology
Surveys the ways of deriving meaning from anthropological data by numerical means, including, but not confined to basic statistical procedures. Prereq: College-level algebra or its equivalent. Cross-listed with ANTH 5053. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4070/5070 Culture of Development and Globalization
Anthropological critiques of development and globalization point out that they have occurred without regard for the diversity of human culture and human need. Beginning with this analysis, this course goes one step further by examining culture and values of development and how they affect the way development gets done. Prereq: Upper division standing and permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ANTH 5070. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4080/5080 Global Health Practice
A travel-study course that provides students the opportunity to work on global health issues in the context of a supervised internship experience. In addition to a formal internship placement or directed research opportunity, students attend formal lectures and participate in seminars devoted to addressing those health issues most relevant to the country in which the course is being taught. Prereq: HBSC/ANTH 4010/5014, HBSC/ANTH 4020/5024, HLTH 6070 or equivalent. Cross-listed with ANTH 5080, HBSC 4080 and 5080. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4090/5090 Political Economy of the Drug Culture
Psychotropic drugs, both legal and illicit, are a predominant part of our everyday lives. This course examines their use and meaning within cultures, and the social, political and economic issues that surround their production, use and misuse. Prereq: introductory course in cultural anthropology. Cross-listed with ANTH 5090. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4140/5140 Principles of Economic Anthropology
(Note: Course description pending.)

4170/5170 Culture and the Environment
(Note: 4170/5170 was switched with 4070/5070 on Approved Courses List) Examines the historical origins of Western and non-Western ideas of the environment and the place of people within it. The imposition of Western ideas on non-Western groups regarding environmental policy is also examined, with special attention given to practices of conservation, development and transnational monetary policy. Prereq: ANTH 2102 or equivalent. Cross-listed with ANTH 5170. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4220/5220 Community in a Global Context
(Note: Course description pending.)

4450/5450 Conservation and Development: Contemporary Issues
Applies the theoretical paradigms of political ecology to contemporary issues of sustainable development. Case studies are chosen illustrating topics based on faculty expertise and student interaction. The first part of the course presents theoretical perspectives relevant to the chosen topic. In the second half, students participate in directed problem solving activities. Prereq: ANTH 4070, ANTH 4170 and graduate standing or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ANTH 5450. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4460/5460 Development and Conservation: Theory and Practice
Examines the praxis of anthropological knowledge of human ecosystem interaction and development of economic opportunities. Issues of biodiversity, resource conservation, sustainable development and globalization are studied. Prereq: ANTH 4450 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with ANTH 5460. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4560/5560 Human Ecology
Studies demographic and ecological variables as they relate to human populations. Aspects of natural selection, overpopulation and environmental deterioration are considered. Prereq: Introductory course in biological or physical anthropology. Cross-listed with ANTH 5560. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

6063 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology
Much of the data collected in the social sciences is interview and text-based. This course explores methods for collecting and analyzing these data and theoretical paradigms that underlie these methods. Cross-listed with HBSC 7051. ​

2

 Integrated Biology [BIOL]

3122 Natural History of Colorado
(Note: Course description pending.)

3330 Plant Diversity
Surveys all major plant groups using evolutionary and ecological principles to interpret patterns of diversity in form and function. Topics include reproduction and life cycles, adaptations and ecological interactions, paleobotany and biogeography, classification and taxonomy and evolution. Prereq: One year of general biology with a grade of “C-” or higher. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3411 Principles of Ecology
A lecture course that examines the interrelationships between organisms and their environments. Subject matter includes organism, population and ecosystem levels of study and application to current environmental issues. The emphasis is on the underlying principles of ecology that involve all types of organisms. Note: Satisfies core ecology requirement for biology major. May not be used as upper division biology elective. No co-credit with BIOL 3412. Prereq: One year of general biology with a grade of “C-” or higher. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3412 Fundamentals of Applied Ecology
Ecology is the science of interrelationships between organisms, including humans and their environment. This lecture course examines applications of ecological principles to human needs and environmental protection. Covers the ecology of humans and managed systems. Note: Satisfies core ecology requirement for biology major. May not be used as upper division biology elective. No co-credit with BIOL 3411. Prereq: One year of general biology with a grade of “C-” or higher. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3654 General Microbiology
Covers all aspects of the biology of microorganisms: their cellular structures and function, growth and metabolism, general and molecular genetics, diversity and interactions with other organisms and the environment (ecology). The objective is to provide students with a thorough introduction to microbiology including basic micro-biological laboratory techniques. Note: General cell biology or general genetics is recommended. Prereq: One year of general biology and one year of general chemistry with grades of “C-” or higher. Semester Hours: 4 to 4

4052 Advanced Ecology
This combination seminar and lecture course focuses on state-of-field knowledge, current theories and recent models in selected areas of ecology, such as theoretical ecology, evolutionary ecology, population biology and ecosystems ecology. Prereq: Introductory ecology with a grade of “C-” or higher (BIOL 3411 or BIOL 3412 or equivalent). Cross-listed with BIOL 5052. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4154 Conservation Biology
Basic concepts and theories in ecology, population biology and genetics as they apply to issues relating to the preservation of biodiversity, such as the genetics of small populations, captive propagation, restoration ecology and the design of nature reserves. Prereq: Introductory ecology (BIOL 3411, 3412 or equivalent) with a grade of “C-” or higher. Cross-listed with BIOL 5154. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4355 Flora of Colorado
Lecture, lab and field trips. Introduces the vascular plant flora of Colorado, including ferns, gymnosperms and flowering plants. Emphasis on field identification of species representing a range of natural communities from grassland to alpine tundra, as well as non-natives. Field and herbarium techniques covered. Prereq: One year of general biology with a grade of “C-” or higher. Cross-listed with BIOL 5345. Semester Hours: 4 to 4

4415 Microbial Ecology
An in-depth study of ecology as it relates to microorganisms; abiotic and biotic interactions within microbial populations in macro- and microhabitats; and the role of microorganisms in maintaining steady state conditions in natural ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on how the ecology of microorganisms affects the human condition. Prereq: General microbiology with a grade of “C-” or higher. Cross-listed with BIOL 5415. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4416 Aquatic Ecology
This advanced ecology course examines the inter-relations of biological (including humans), physical and chemical components of wetlands, streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and groundwater. Learning is facilitated through lectures, discussions, student presentations, laboratory and field exercises. Prereq: Introductory ecology (BIOL 3411, 3412 or equivalent) with a grade of “C-” or higher. Cross-listed with BIOL 5416. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4474 Ecological Methods
Deals with the empirical aspects of an ecological study. Students learn sampling techniques that are used in plant and animal ecology. Emphasis is placed on hypothesis testing, data analysis and experimental field designs. Prereq: Introductory ecology (BIOL 3411, 3412 or equivalent) with a grade of “C-” or higher. Cross-listed with BIOL 5474. Semester Hours: 4 to 4

4910 Field Studies
Field studies of individuals, populations and communities comprising a specified ecosystem. Emphasis on field identification of vascular plants and vertebrate animals. Topics include the physical environment, biotic and abiotic interactions, life history, ecological adaptations and biogeography. Note: Lectures and a week-long field trip. Prereq: One year of general biology and ecology with grades of “C-” or higher; permission of instructor. Cross-listed with BIOL 5910. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4974 Evolution
A capstone course that draws upon concepts from all fields of biology. Topics include the fossil record, mass extinctions, the historical development of the modern synthesis, principles and mechanisms of evolution, current viewpoints and controversies. Prereq: One year of general biology and general genetics with grades of “C-” or higher; junior or senior standing strongly recommended. Cross-listed with BIOL 5974. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

3

 Chemistry [CHEM]

4700/5700 Environmental Chemistry
A discussion of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the water, soil, and air environments. Prereq: CHEM 3111 or 3411. Cross-listed with CHEM 5700. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5710 Air Pollution Chemistry
Chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere are discussed. Includes application to air pollution problems, including urban air pollution, air quality standards, non-urban air pollution, acid deposition, and stratospheric pollution. Prereq: CHEM 4521 or 4700. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5720 Atmospheric Sampling and Analysis
Fundamentals of environmental sampling specifically applied to the atmosphere are discussed. Includes a variety of techniques for the measurement of monitoring gaseous, semi-volatile and particulate air pollutants, techniques for the measurement of criteria pollutants, chemical and physical measurements of particulate and air toxins. Prereq: CHEM 4700 or CHEM 5710 or permission of instructor. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4

 Communication [COMM]

4282/5282 Environmental Communication
Studies the communication processes involved in policies and practices affecting natural and human environments. Cross-listed with COMM 5282. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4410/5410 Science Writing
An intensive practice in composing for diverse science publication genres and venues and practice in analyzing the ways consumers obtain and process information about scientific developments and controversies. Prereq: at least one writing or composition course at the 3000 level or above. Cross-listed with COMM 5410. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4710/5710 Communication and Environmental Sustainability
(Note: Course description pending.)

4710/5710 Environmental Conflict
(Note: Course description pending.)

4710/5710 Wilderness Communication
(Note: Course description pending.)

5

 Economics [ECON]

4530/5530 Economics of Natural Resources
Examines economic models of renewable resource management and models of exhaustible resource depletion. Analyzes decisions made by private firms and governments affecting the methods and rate of resource development. Examines the effects of resource development on economic growth and environmental quality and the effects of economic development on resource scarcity. Prereq: ECON 2022. Cross-listed with ECON 5530. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4540/5540 Environment Economics
Economic approach to environmental problems: relationship between ownership structures, externalities and environmental damage; poverty, population pressure, and environmental degradation; valuation of environmental amenities; sustainability of economic activity; cost-benefit analysis applied to the environment; evaluation of alternative instruments for environmental control. Prereq: ECON 2022. Cross-listed with ECON 5540. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4770 Economic Development: Theory and Problems
Introduces theory and practice of economic development. Topics include development and growth models, economic planning, income distribution, human and capital resources, foreign investment and the multinationals, technology transfer, trade and development. Discussions of current issues regarding world debt, economic stabilization, the new protectionism, empirical studies, and examples of development in various countries. Prereq: ECON 2012 or ECON 2022. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5530 Economics of Natural Resources
Examines economic models of renewable resource management and models of exhaustible resource depletion. Analyzes decisions made by private firms and governments affecting the methods and rate of resource development. Examines the effects of resource development on economic growth and environmental quality and the effects of economic development on resource scarcity. Prereq: ECON 5073. Cross-listed with ECON 4530. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5540 Environmental Economics
Economic approach to environmental problems: relationship between ownership structures, externalities and environmental damage; poverty, population pressure, and environmental degradation; valuation of environmental amenities; sustainability of economic activity; cost-benefit analysis applied to the environment; evaluation of alternative instruments for environmental control. Prereq: ECON 5073. Cross-listed with ECON 4540. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

6

 Engineering [ENGR]

3400 Technology and Culture
Explores the cultural and political foundations of technology and the impact of technology upon the individual and society. Contributions to technological advances and the impact of technology on women and diverse ethnic groups are examined in the context of specific engineering designs and case studies. Prereq: One course in social sciences, one course in humanities, one course in science. (Satisfies the multicultural diversity requirement of the UCDHSC core curriculum). Semester Hours: 3 to 3

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 Environmental Sciences [ENVS]

1042 Introduction to Environmental Science
This laboratory or survey course develops a basic understanding of ecological relationships and environmental systems. Issues such as the effects of human activities on earth’s environment, extinction or diversity, greenhouse effect, hazardous or toxic wastes and human population growth are discussed. Semester Hours: 4 to 4

1342 Environment, Society and Sustainability
Overview of perspectives on environmental issues within the context of sustainable development and taking a systems approach. The focus is on social science approaches to explore the human footprint on the earth, environmentalism, scientific uncertainty, policy creation and social change. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5000 Biochemical Cycles
(Note: Course description pending.)

5010 Air Pollution
(Note: Course description pending.)

5020 Earth Environments and Human Impacts
Basic concepts describing earth’s biomes and physical environment are presented in a systems context. Global warming assessment, from both political and scientific perspectives, is then presented. Model visualization of these concepts to consider human impacts on Earth’s biomes is discussed. Earth system viewpoint, having links of Earth’s biomes to oceans and atmosphere, completes the course discussion. Cross-listed with GEOG 4020, GEOL 4020. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5030 Environmental Geology
Applies geological information to interactions between people and the physical environment. Increasing awareness of its importance in our society means that this is an expanding field as companies are required to address the environmental consequences of their actions. Prereq: Entry into MSES program, senior standing in sciences or geography, or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOL 4030 and 5030. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

5600 Applied Statistics for Natural Sciences
Surveys statistical techniques including: quick review of basic statistics, tests for normality and outliers, display of data; simple and multiple regression; ANOVA and its relation to regression. Emphasis on computer or stat-pak analysis and interpretation of statistical results. Prereq: College algebra and GEOG 3080, or consent of an instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 4770, GEOL 4770, 5770. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

8

 Geography [GEOG]

3300 - Population and Resources in the World Environment
Increasing world human populations are examined in the context of regional and global resources. Opposing viewpoints are studied, and students are required to complete a case study of a self-selected issue analyzing viewpoints associated with relevant opposing opinions. Prereq: upper division standing. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4060/5060 Remote Sensing I: Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing
An in-depth treatment of the use of aerial photographs and other forms of imagery for the analysis of urban-industrial patterns, vegetation, agriculture, landforms, and geologic structure. Prereq: GEOG 3080 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5060, GEOL 4060, GEOL 5060. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4080/5080 Introduction to GIS
Introduces various aspects of geographic information systems (GIS), including justification, definition of hardware/software, database design, and data conversion. GIS is a computer-based mapping system providing a graphical interface to locational and relational attribute data on facilities and land. Includes hands-on use of a geographic information system workstation. Prereq: GEOG 3080 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5080. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4090/5090 Environmental Modeling with GIS
Expands the basic knowledge of GIS to spatial models. Establishes a comprehensive framework that can be used to address a wide range of applications in natural and built environments. Prereq: GEOG 4080 or GEOG 5080 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5090. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4220 Environmental Impact Assessment
The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for understanding the environmental impact assessment process, its legal context, and the criteria and methods for procedural and substantive compliance. Prereq: URPL 5530 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5220, URPL 6651. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4230/5230 Hazard Mitigation and Vulnerability Assessment
Examines hazard mitigation and its planning and policy implications, emphasizing how vulnerability assessments play an integral role. Students explore how mitigation minimizes the impacts from hazards and use GIS to conduct a local study. Prereq: GEOG 2202 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5230. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4260 Natural Resource Planning and Management
Considers methods for managing renewable and non-renewable resources using both legislative and economic controls. The role of technology, ideologies, and equity are discussed. Decision making techniques are applied to problems of resource and environmental management. The ability to allocate and control resource usage to ensure sustainability are discussed. Cross-listed with URPL 6653. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4265/5265 Sustainability in Resource Management
Sustainability and sustainable development are the dominant economic, environmental and social issues of the 21st century. Follows a multi-disciplinary approach to these concepts. Case studies demonstrate their implementation in different geographical, ecological and socio-economic conditions worldwide. Prereq: ENVS 1042 or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with GEOG 5265. Semester Hours: 3 to 3

4335/5335 Contemporary Environmental Issues
Provides an overview of environmental challenges facing society today, focusing on how humans impact and change the environment. Opposing views and environmental policy at the local, state, national, and international levels are explored. Cross-listed with GEOG 5335. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4350/5350 Environment and Society in the American Past
Overview of the geographical development of North American society from the late 15th century to the mid-20th century. A comparative regional approach emphasizing relationships between natural resource exploitation, cultural landscape formation and environmental change. Cross-listed with GEOG 5350. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4420 The Politics of Nature
(Note: Course description pending.) ​

4440 - Science, Policy and the Environment
Examines the social, economic and political forces shaping scientific discovery and the development and enforcement of environmental policy. Students will examine perspectives on issues such as risk, expertise, uncertainty and objectivity that influence the problem-defining, standard-setting and policy-making process. Cross-listed with GEOG 5440. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4680 Urban Sustainability: Perspectives and Practice
(Note: Course description pending.) ​

4710 Disasters, Climate Change, and Health
(Note: Course description pending.) ​

9

 History [HIST]

3366 Environmental History of North America
Examines the conversation that the peoples of North America have had with the earth, from Indian prehistory to modern industrial civilization. Out of the people-land dialogue has emerged a variety of cultures, some of which, as we shall see, successfully adapted to their environment, while others failed. Prereq: HIST 1361, 1362, 1381 or 1382. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4240 National Parks History
Introduces how the National Park Service uses history to identify, designate, preserve, and interpret America’s most outstanding historic and natural history sites. After tours of NPS sites, students select from a wide range of projects. Note: Open to all students. Cross-listed with HIST 5240. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

10

 Philosophy [PHIL]

2510 Philosophy of Nature
Critical comparison of different views of nature presupposed in science, art, religion, and environmental policy. Concepts of “natural” are examined in relation to such issues as animal rights, wilderness preservation, synthetic landscape, technology, pollution, and population control. Semester Hours: 3to 3 ​

4250 Environmental Ethics
While human industry/technology creates enormous material prosperity, it can result in devastating environmental damage. This course analyzes the moral values, consequences and duties implied in relationships between human beings, animals and ecological systems, while seeking out new and ethical approaches. Cross-listed with PHIL 5250, HUMN 5250 and SSCI 5250. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

11

 Political Science [PSC]

4146 Indigenous Politics
Surveys the status of the world’s native peoples and nations, and the role of law and politics in the future of indigenous peoples in the global arena. Examines questions of human rights, economic development, and international law and politics. Prereq: PSCI 1001. Cross-listed with PSCI 5145 and ETST 4146. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4354 Environmental Politics
Political, legal, and economic forces in environmental law and policy. Special emphasis on air and water pollution and on threats to public and agricultural land. Environmental groups and their opponents. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4365 Global Ecological Crises
Overview of global ecological problems such as climate change, transboundary pollutions, and loss of bio-diversity in an attempt to understand the political, economic, and cultural forces behind these problems and the status of legal and policy initiatives to address them. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

5217 Human Rights in Theory and Practice
(Note: Course description pending.) ​

5276 Conflicts and Rights in International Law
Explores contending interpretations and practices in international law regarding issues such as the legitimacy of humanitarian intervention, efficacy of truth commissions, tensions between truth and justice in cases of genocide and war crimes, and legal changes needed to devise viable rules. Cross-listed with PSCI 4276. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

5468 Research Methods in Political Science
Analysis and evaluation of research methods, techniques, and empirical materials in political science application to Internet research. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4680 - Urban Sustainability: Perspectives and Practice
Examines various perspectives on sustainability, including ambiguities and opportunities of sustainability as a conceptual framework. Class also examines what sustainability looks like in practice, using numerous topics such as poverty and urban farming to water and climate change. Cross-listed with GEOG 5680. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

4710 - Disasters, Climate Change, and Health
Provides a review of the impacts of disasters and climate change on human health, using a broad framework of preparedness, mitigation, response, recovery, and adaptation. Prereq: GEOG 2202 or GEOG 3501. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

12

 Physics [PHYS]

3082 Energy and the Environment
For students of various backgrounds who wish to increase their understanding of the environmental and technical issues of supplying the energy demands of our society. Alternative energy sources and conservation are explored as solutions to promote a sustainable society. Prereq: One course in college science or mathematics. Cross-listed with PHYS 3082. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​

13

 Public Health [PBHL]

2020 Introduction to Environmental Health
This introductory survey course focuses on the human health implications of environmental exposures. Topics include pathways of exposure, toxicology, risk assessment, regulations, and policy development. Additionally, environmental equity, ethics, globalization, international perspectives, climate change, sustainability, and activism are considered. Semester Hours: 3 to 3 ​​

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