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University of Colorado Denver College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

 

FAQ's

Where can I get a copy of the AMCAS and/or AACOMAS application?


 
Where can I get a copy of the AMCAS and/or AACOMAS application?

The AADSAS application is an online application only. As part of this application, you will find a worksheet that you can download and print out. This allows you to work on the application off-line. I would strongly recommend using the work sheet. AADSAS will restrict how long you can be online at one time. It will be much better use of your time to do as much as you can offline.

What is the deadline for submitting the AADSAS application?

The deadline for submitting the AADSAS application is based on the deadline for the dental school you are applying to. Most of the dental schools in the United States have a November 1st or November 15th deadline. However, some are in October, and some are in December.

Regardless of the dental school deadline, you should submit your application as close to the earliest date you can submit your application.  Last year that date was June 18th.  It does not matter that you are planning on taking the DAT after you submit your application (as long as you stay on the same cycle). AADSAS can process your application and have it ready to go once your DAT scores are released. The sooner you get your AADSAS application in the

How much will it cost to submit my AADSAS application?

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The current fee for both is $155.00 for one school and an additional $55.00 for each school after that. Keep in mind as well that AADSAS will not refund any money for missed deadlines.

What things should I put on my application with respect to experience and jobs?

Everything. You should list all things you have been involved with, both dental and non-dental. The new AADSAS application gives you a place to put who you worked for or did volunteer work for, the dates you did the work, how many hours you worked per week on average, and a brief description of what you did. So you should include functions and activities with church's, civil groups, boy scouts, girl scouts, 4-H, Masons, etc. The goal here is to let them know who you are, and what you feel is important enough to be a part of. This is a place for you to "toot your own horn" so to speak. The one warning I have is to make sure you can articulate how each of these things have helped to make you a better candidate for dental school. If you did something that did not help much, such as spending a summer in the Bahama's playing in the sun, don't mention it on this application.

What exactly is the personal statement for and what should I put in my personal statement ?

    The personal statement is a place for you to tell about yourself. There are several ways you can approach this in my opinion. The personal statement is a place for you to answer the questions "Who am I?" or "What are the key events or the key people that have gotten me to this point in time?". Use this space to tell the dental schools about yourself, both pros and cons. If you have something negative on your application such as low gpa, bad semester, minimal experience, etc., use this space to succinctly talk about this. Be sure if you do this, to end that discussion with something positive, like how that has helped you learn about yourself and made you a better candidate.

    One of the things I recommend is to give your personal statement to at least 5 different people, some of whom know you very well, some of whom do not know you very well. Have them read your statement, put it down, and then tell you who you are, and why you have chosen to go to dental school. They should be able to tell you the key points in your life that have led you to making this decision. You should be able to see/hear yourself when they tell you what they read. If what they tell you is what you want the committee's at the various dental schools to know, then you are probably close to being done. However, if what you hear is nothing like what you want, then you have work to do.

    The other pitfall I would recommend avoiding is to write a futuristic story in the third person. It doesn't tell people much. It tells them what you hope to be, but not how or why.

    The personal statement is your closing argument. It is your chance to direct the attention of the committee to whatever you want them to pay particular attention to. Be upbeat, positive, and professional. Do not get flowery with your language. If they read a statement that is worthy of a literary Nobel prize, but when they interview you, you use normal everyday words, they are going to wonder who wrote your personal statement for you. Write the same way you talk. Don't try to be fancy. Be clear. Be concise. Tell them about yourself.

Can I leave the personal statement page blank?

Yes, if you don't want to go to dental school. A blank personal statement page is a guaranteed rejection. You don't have to fill it up, but you must put something down. Do not leave it blank.

How do I know when my personal statement is ready? How can I tell when it is done?

As was stated in a question above, one of the things I recommend is to give your personal statement to at least 5 different people, some of whom know you very well, some of whom do not know you very well. Have them read your statement, put it down, and then tell you who you are, and why you have chosen to go to dental school. They should be able to tell you the key points in your life that have led you to making this decision. You should be able to see/hear yourself when they tell you what they read. If what they tell you is what you want the committee's at the various dental schools to know, then you are probably close to being done. However, if what you hear is nothing like what you want, then you have work to do.

How do I list courses that may not be strictly biology, chemistry, physics, or math?

One of the things you will have to do on your AADSAS application is list all of the courses you have taken since you started college. It is called the course inventory. AADSAS as well as the dental schools leave it up to you to make the decision as to whether a course is biology, chemistry, physics, math, or all other. This is easy when the course name has a biol or chem or math or phys abbreviation. The problem becomes what to do with certain psychology or engineering courses. The decision as to what to declare these types of courses is strictly up to you. It is supposed to be based on the majority content of the course. If the course content was primarily one of the above types, then you classify it accordingly. If the class content was not primarily science or math, then it is classified as an "all other" course. If you have problems, see me.

Yes. If you leave any of the questions blank, your application will not be processed.

Once I have submitted my AADSAS application, can I correct it or make additions?

Yes and No. You can change contact information such as your address, phone, email address et.c But once the AADSAS is sent in and processed, it is done. If you discover an error, there is nothing you can do about it. That is why it is so critical that you make sure you proof read your entire application, and have at least three other people proof read it as well. In addition, you cannot send in any other documents to add to your AADSAS application. If any documents other than transcripts are received by the AADSAS people before they ask for them, they will simply shred them. The bottom line is to make sure you have completed your application properly and had several people help you proof read it as well.

Do I send my letters of recommendation or other documents in with my AADSAS?

AADSAS is experimenting with having letters sent directly to AADSAS for distribution to the various dental schools. It still has some bugs, but is working better each year. Follow the directions given by the AADSAS application packet.

What is a secondary application? What is included in these applications?

    The secondary application is the application sent to you by the specific medical schools to which you have applied. Once they have received your AADSAS application, and evaluated whether or not you are a valid candidate, they will send you a secondary application. This application will ask questions that pertain specifically to the school you have applied to. These will include questions about why their specific school, what programs they have that you find interesting, what support systems you might have in the area etc. It is critical that you investigate each school and find out about specific programs they have, and other factors so that you can talk intelligently about the school when you interview or fill out the secondary application.

    Often times, these applications will ask you for a second personal statement. DO NOT just copy the statement from your AADSAS application. They already have this one. They want to know other things, and will often guide that with specific questions. In addition, there will often be a question about whether or not there is anything else you want to add that was not included in your original AADSAS application. This would be one place to mention errors on your AADSAS application if they were significant. This would also be the place to add information about other classes you have taken, further clinical or research experience that was not included on the AADSAS application and the like.

How do I get a secondary application one?

Secondary applications are sent to valid candidates only after the dental school to which you have applied as evaluated all your academic credentials, and feels you are still a valid candidate. You really have no control over this. You cannot call or write and get one early. Once you have turned in your AADSAS, you can expect to start receiving secondary applications within three to four weeks on average.

When are secondary applications due?

Most schools want your secondary applications back within 2-3 weeks. Do not put these off. They are as difficult if not more so than the AADSAS to complete, and you don't have nearly the time to do them that you had to complete the AADSAS. Keep in mind also that every school charges an additional fee that must be returned with the secondary application. This is on average right now is about $60.00 per school. However, some are as high now as $120.00.