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College of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado Denver

College of Architecture & Planning
 

COURSE SEQUENCE BS ARCH

College of Architecture + Planning


​Courses identified by an asterisk (*) satisfy National Architectural Accrediting​ Board (NAAB) Student Performance Criteria (SPC). While a number of courses in the core contribute to the satisfaction of the NAAB SPC, only the architecture courses in which evidence documenting that a criterion has been met are identified.

Course Sequence for Intra-Campus Transfer Admits  (75 credits)

​YEAR ​TERM ​COURSES​ ​SCHOOL ​CREDIT HOURS
​Year One ​Fall
​Spring
​Year Two ​Fall
​Spring ARCH 2230 Architectural History I*
ARCH 1110 Intro to Architectural Theory
ARCH 2110 Architectural Studio I
ARCH Elective
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​3
3
3
2
3
​Year Three ​Fall ARCH 3110 Design Studio II*
ARCH 3230 Architectural History II*
ARCH 3130 Construction Practices I*
International Perspectives
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CLAS
​6
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 3120 Design Studio III*
ARCH 3330 Building Systems I*
ARCH 3430 Construction Practices II*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Year Four ​Fall ARCH 4110 Design Studio IV*
ARCH 3340 Structures I*
ARCH 4440 Building Systems II*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 4120 Design Studio V*
ARCH 4340 Structures II*​
ARCH  Elective
ARCH  Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
 

​Course Sequence for Community College Graduates  (69 credits)

​YEAR ​TERM ​COURSES​ ​SCHOOL ​CREDIT HOURS
​Year One ​Fall
​Spring
​Year Two ​Fall
​Spring
​Year Three ​Fall ARCH 2110 Design Studio I*
ARCH 2230 Architectural History I*
ARCH 1110 Intro to Architectural Theory
ARCH 3130 Construction Practices I
International Perspectives
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
CLAS
​3
3
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 3110 Design Studio II*
ARCH 3330 Building Systems I*
ARCH 3430 Construction Practices II*
ARCH 3230 Architectural History II
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Summer  ARCH 3120 Design Studio III*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
​6
3
​Year Four ​Fall ARCH 4110 Design Studio IV*
ARCH 3340 Structures I*
ARCH 4440 Building Systems II*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 4120 Design Studio V*
ARCH 4340 Structures II*​
ARCH  Elective
ARCH  E​lective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
 

Course Sequence for Freshmen  ​(120 credits)​

​YEAR ​TERM ​COURSES​ ​SCHOOL ​CREDIT HOURS
​Year One ​Fall MATH 1130 Pre-Calculus Math
ENGL 1020 Composition I*
Arts and Humanities Elective I
Behavioral Science Elective
Elective
CLAS
CLAS
CLAS
CLAS
CLAS
​4
3
3
3
3
​Spring BIOL 1550 or ENVS 1042 Intro to Env. Sciences*
ENGL 2030 Composition II*
Social Science Elective
Arts and Humanities Elective II
ARCH 1110 Intro to Architecture*
CLAS
CLAS
CLAS
CLAS/CAM
CAP
​4
3
3
3
3
​Year Two ​Fall PHYS 2010/2030 College Physics I
ARCH 2230 Architectural History I*
Elective
Elective
CLAS
CAP
CLAS
CLAS/CAM
​5
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 2110 Design Studio I*
International Perspectives Elective*
ARCH Elective
ARCH Elective
Elective
CAP
CLAS/CAM
CAP
CAP
CLAS
​3
3
2
3
3
​Year Three ​Fall ARCH 3110 Design Studio II*
ARCH 3230 Architectural History II*
ARCH 3130 Construction Practices I*
Cultural Diversity Elective*
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CLAS
​6
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 3120 Design Studio III*
ARCH 3330 Building Systems I*
ARCH 3430 Construction Practices II*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Year Four ​Fall ARCH 4110 Design Studio IV*
ARCH 3340 Structures I*
ARCH 4440 Building Systems II*
ARCH Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
​Spring ARCH 4120 Design Studio V*
ARCH 4340 Structures II*​
ARCH  Elective
ARCH  Elective
​CAP
CAP
CAP
CAP
​6
3
3
3
 

  • The ARCH 1110, 2110, 2220 courses will be offered in Fall, Spring and Summer Semester each year.  The 2000 level classes are restricted to students with sophomore standing. They will be open to majors and non-majors on the downtown campus.
  • The program will encourage students to make use of the internship opportunities available to them locally, regionally, nationally and internationally by completing a maximum of six credits of ARCH elective coursework in the area of either Professional Internship or Service Learning.  These internship opportunities will be restricted to seniors.  Only internships completed after the third year of study in an undergraduate program satisfy internship credits that qualify candidates to sit for the required Architects Registration Examination.  
  • ​Focus Areas:  The faculty will develop elective course groupings that define Focus Areas of study.  The coursework will consist of both ARCH and other coursework available on the campus.  The Focus Areas will create opportunities for students to build expertise in particular areas of knowledge and/or technique that will enhance their prospects once they graduate from the program.   We see opportunities for focus area studies in the following potential fields: Sustainability, International Studies, Management, Art/Architecture History, Digital Design, Real Estate Development, Urban and Regional Planning, Urban Design, Historic Preservation, Design Build, Law Studies, and Mediation, among others.
    ​ 

NAAB Criteria

The NAAB has established 32 Student Performance Criteria (SPCs) that all graduates of an accredited professional program (such as an MArch) must satisfy.  Course offerings in the BS Arch program are integrated with those of the MArch program offered by the College of Architecture and Planning. Students graduating with the BS Arch degree will satisfy 19 of the 32 criteria embedded in the MArch degree.  The remaining 13 criteria would be acquired as part of the MArch degree. ​

The learning goals established by the 19 applicable NAAB criteria are listed below (using the NAAB numbering system). 
A.1. Communication Skills: Ability to read, write, speak and listen effectively.
A.2. Design Thinking Skills: Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against relevant criteria and standards.
A.3. Visual Communication Skills: Ability to use appropriate representational media, such as traditional graphic and digital technology skills, to convey essential formal elements at each stage of the programming and design process.  
A.4. Technical Documentation: Ability to make technically clear drawings, write outline specifications, and prepare models illustrating and identifying the assembly of materials, systems, and components appropriate for a building design.  
A.5. Investigative Skills: Ability to gather, assess, record, apply, and comparatively evaluate relevant information within architectural coursework and design processes.  
A.6. Fundamental Design Skills: Ability to effectively use basic architectural and environmental principles in design.  
A.7. Use of Precedents: Ability to examine and comprehend the fundamental principles present in relevant precedents and to make choices regarding the incorporation of such principles into architecture and urban design projects.  
A.8. Ordering Systems Skills: Understanding of the fundamentals of both natural and formal ordering systems and the capacity of each to inform two- and three-dimensional design.  
A.9. Historical Traditions and Global Culture: Understanding of parallel and divergent canons and traditions of architecture, landscape and urban design including examples of indigenous, vernacular, local, regional, national settings from the Eastern, Western, Northern, and Southern hemispheres in terms of their climatic, ecological, technological, socioeconomic, public health, and cultural factors.  
A.10. Cultural Diversity: Understanding of the diverse needs, values, behavioral norms, physical abilities, and social and spatial patterns that characterize different cultures and individuals and the implication of this diversity on the societal roles and responsibilities of architects.  
A.11. Applied Research: Understanding the role of applied research in determining function, form, and systems and their impact on human conditions and behavior.  
B.8 Environmental Systems: Understanding the principles of environmental systems’ design such as embodied energy, active and passive heating and cooling, indoor air quality, solar orientation, day lighting and artificial illumination, and acoustics; including the use of appropriate performance assessment tools.  
B.9. Structural Systems: Understanding of the basic principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral forces and the evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural systems.  
B.10. Building Envelope Systems: Understanding of the basic principles involved in the appropriate application of building envelope systems and associated assemblies relative to fundamental performance, aesthetics, moisture transfer, durability, and energy and material resources.  
B.11. Building Service Systems: Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of building service systems such as plumbing, electrical, vertical transportation, security, and fire protection systems.  
B.12. Building Materials and Assemblies: Understanding of the basic principles utilized in the appropriate selection of construction materials, products, components, and assemblies, based on their inherent characteristics and performance, including their environmental impact and reuse.  
C.1. Collaboration: Ability to work in collaboration with others and in multidisciplinary teams to successfully complete design projects.  
C.2. Human Behavior: Understanding of the relationship between human behavior, the natural environment and the design of the built environment.  
C.9. Community and Social Responsibility: Understanding of the architect’s responsibility to work in the public interest, to respect historic resources, and to improve the quality of life for local and global neighbors. 



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