Skip to main content
Navigate Up
Sign In

University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus

University of Colorado Denver, Newsroom

Contact Info

Email Us >

Contact a Specialist >

Submit a Story >

For General Inquiries:

Call 303-724-1520
or Fax 303-724-1521

Address:

The Anschutz Medical Campus,
Building 500, Room CG009
13001 E. 17th Place
Mail Stop F413,
P.O. Box 6508
Aurora, CO 80045-0508

New study shows early mammograms save more lives

Questions earlier government recommendations

1/27/2011
New study shows early mammograms save more lives

AURORA, Colo. — A new study questions the controversial US Preventative Service Task Force recommendations for breast cancer screening, with data that shows starting at a younger age and screening more frequently will result in more lives saved.

The study analyzed the same data looked at by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which issued its guidelines on mammography screening in November 2009. The study authors compared the task force’s recommendations for screening every other year in women 50-74 to American Cancer Society guidelines of screening every year in women 40-84.

The study was conducted by R. Edward Hendrick, PhD, clinical professor of radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and Mark Helvie, MD, director of breast imaging at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. It appears in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Hendrick and Helvie used six model scenarios of screening mammography created by the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network. This is the same modeling data the task force considered. The authors compared task force guidelines to American Cancer Society guidelines.

They found that if women begin yearly mammograms at age 40, it reduces breast cancer deaths by 40 percent. When screening begins at 50 and occurs every other year, it reduces breast cancer deaths 23 percent. The difference: 71 percent more lives saved with yearly screening beginning at 40.

“Task force guidelines have created confusion among women, leading some to forego mammography altogether. Mammography is one of the few screening tools that has been proven to save lives and our analysis shows that for maximum survival, annual screening beginning at 40 is best. This data gives women more information to make an informed choice about the screening schedule that’s best for them,” says Helvie, professor of radiology at the U-M Medical School.

As part of their recommendation, the task force emphasized the potential harms mammography can cause – including pain during the screening exam and anxiety from false-positives, which can lead to additional imaging or biopsy.

The study authors found that women ages 40-49 who are screened annually will have a false-positive mammogram once every 10 years. They will get asked back for more tests once every 12 years and will undergo a false-positive biopsy once every 149 years.

“The USPSTF overemphasized potential harms of screening mammography, while ignoring the proven statistically significant benefit of annual screening mammography starting at age 40.” says Hendrick. “In addition, the panel ignored more recent data from screening programs in Sweden and Canada showing that 40 percent of breast cancer deaths are averted in women who get regular screening mammography. Our modeling results agree completely with these screening program results in terms of the large number of women lives saved by regular screening mammography.”

Breast cancer statistics: 209,060 Americans will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and 40,230 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society

Reference: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 196, W112-W116, February 2011

 

About the University of Colorado Cancer Center

The University of Colorado Cancer Center is the Rocky Mountain region’s only National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. NCI has given only 40 cancer centers this designation, deeming membership as “the best of the best.” Headquartered on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, UCCC is a consortium of three state universities (Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder and University of Colorado Denver) and six institutions (University of Colorado Hospital, The Children’s Hospital, Denver Health, Denver VA Medical Center, National Jewish Health and Kaiser Permanente of Colorado). Together, our 440 members are working to ease the cancer burden through cancer care, research, education and prevention and control. Learn more at www.uccc.info.

About the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is one of 40 centers designated "comprehensive" by the National Cancer Institute and one of 21 institutions that make up the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, which sets national guidelines for consistent, high-quality and cost-effective cancer care. More than 400 faculty members deliver compassionate care to today’s patients and research ways to improve treatments for tomorrow’s patients. It’s our mission: the conquest of cancer through innovation and collaboration.

 ###

 CONTACT: Lynn Clark, University of Colorado Cancer Center, 303-724-3160, lynn.clark@ucdenver.edu

Nicole Fawcett, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, 734-764-2220, nfawcett@umich.edu, 734-764-2220